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  • Pauline Hanson at Uluru (@PaulineHansonOz via Twitter)
    australia

    A bad week for Aboriginal rights

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 23 August 2019

    According to anecdotal evidence, Pauline Hanson arrived at Uluru, climbed up to 'chicken rock', slid back down on her backside and then, later, met with some Anangu elders to 'get permission' to climb Uluru. The disrespectful farce was but one illustration of how the week went when it comes to showing respect for Indigenous rights and views.

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  • This cartoon by Chris Johnston portrays a church with blood running under the door and a large Indonesian flag looming over a tattered Timor-Leste flag.
    international

    Timor-Leste's bloody sunrise

    • Mark Raper
    • 23 August 2019

    One man rushed at Dewanto and cut him with a machete. The sister claims that the slaughter then began. Blood flowed out under the doors of the church like a river. Was this what she saw then or what she could not stop seeing in her nightmares? Or both? Over 100 died in Suai that day.

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  • Shamindan Kanapathi, pictured with one of the camp dog puppies from Manus Island. Published with permission.
    australia

    The secretive business of detention dirty work

    • Meg Mundell
    • 21 August 2019
    7 Comments

    If you're not burdened by a conscience, it's a perfect get-rich-quick scheme: offer 'garrison' services to governments reluctant to get their hands dirty. Ensure the vulnerable people you 'manage' are hidden, demonised by politicians and right-wing commentators. Hire cheap labour, minimise your tax, and make millions.

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  • Scorched Earth by Tammy Pemper

    The scorching of Timor-Leste

    • Tammy Pemper
    • 23 August 2019

    I stood to continue on foot around the UN compound. I kept walking, ignoring the screaming, the shooting, the panic. Timorese looked to us. I needed to give them hope. I took motivation from them. More than that, I wanted to stay on my feet. I required time to respond and do what I could when the end came.

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  • A Heron drone, one of the types operated by Frontex. (Photo by Israel Aerospace Industries via Getty Images)

    Death and drones in the Mediterranean

    • Ramona Wadi
    • 23 August 2019
    1 Comment

    Opting for surveillance of migrants instead of rescue operations will result in death by drowning, or torture and possible deaths in Libya. For both scenarios, the EU has cultivated its own brand of impunity. Looking away has become politically acceptable, and the bloc can focus on funding the Libyan Coast Guard to do its dirty work.

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  • Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi at the United Nations headquarters in September 2015. (Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

    India embraces 'might is right' in Kashmir move

    • Brian Toohey
    • 20 August 2019
    2 Comments

    The changes India is making in Kashmir go well beyond a border dispute with Pakistan. When taken in conjunction with the Modi government's policy of removing large numbers of Muslims from their homes in India, the implementation of its philosophy of Hindu supremacy is drastically changing the character of India.

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  • Aboriginal dot art from the cover of Disability Rights Now 2019

    Picture is still bleak for people with disability

    • El Gibbs
    • 15 August 2019
    3 Comments

    Disabled people in Australia are being locked up, dying young and living in poverty, because they are disabled, and particularly if they are Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander. It's been 11 years since Australia ratified the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities, yet disabled people are far from being equal to non-disabled people.

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  • Smiling woman (Getty Creative)

    Ovarian transplant pitch demonises menopause

    • Kate Galloway
    • 13 August 2019
    4 Comments

    As a society we have tended to ignore ageing women, and menopause has been read as a signal of our descent into decrepitude. The sales pitch for a procedure to delay menopause buys into this way of thinking. For many women menopause is not a burden, but a gift: no more menstruation, no more pregnancy, new purpose.

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  • Cartoon by Chris Johnston has Scott Morrison campaigning like n extravert and Bill Shorten campaigning like an introvert.

    The contrasting gospels of Morrison and Shorten

    • Barry Gittins
    • 13 August 2019
    5 Comments

    In Jensen's take, while Shorten expresses honest doubt and cites Christ's golden rule, care of his Jesuit educators, Morrison indulges in a marathon of spiritual self-indulgence. Morrison masterfully works right-wing media outlets, or is worked by them, with Alan Jones leading the PM through a radio interview 'like Simpson led his donkey'.

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  • Georgia Taylor-Brown of Great Britain competes in the AJ Bell World Triathlon on 8 June 2019 in Leeds, England. (Photo by George Wood/Getty Images)

    Athletes model anarchic cooperation

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 19 August 2019
    5 Comments

    The story illustrates the way in which sport, like so many other areas of life, has allowed itself to be defined as a business whose sole reason for existence is to make people compete against others. To refuse to compete, even if an athlete falls in front of you, is anti-competitive behaviour that must be penalised.

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  • Trasfigurazione di Cristo (Savoldo)

    Hiroshima and Transfiguration

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 13 August 2019
    15 Comments

    One event, recalling the revelation of Jesus' relationship to God, is a feast of light; the other, recalling man's inhumanity to man, speaks of darkness. Both are pointers to possible human futures: one of glory and the other of annihilation. The history of nuclear weapons and recent developments present this choice more starkly.

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  • Rocket paper-cut shape on old wood plank with rustic texture background. Credit: whyframestudio / Getty

    Plenary Council rocket science a matter of trust

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 05 August 2019
    48 Comments

    The inclusive and consultative processes in the early stages of preparation for the Plenary Council are a vast improvement on previous practice. They express the desire to involve Catholics in the council. If they are simply dropped on completion and not kept alive in the church, however, the trust they have engendered will be lost.

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  • Dr David Holmes presents on what is best practice communication of climate science and impacts for Victorian policy makers, for Monash Climate Change Communication Research Hub, Melbourne.

    Can weather presenters be climate saviours?

    • Greg Foyster
    • 16 August 2019
    2 Comments

    The media often portrays climate change as a political issue. But politicians are the least trusted messengers for climate information. They really turn off the public. The most trusted are scientists, firefighters, farmers and weather presenters. Of these, only weather presenters have a large audience and are already skilled communicators.

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  • Extinction Rebellion protestors block the streets of Brisbane on 6 August 2019. (Photo by Chris Hyde/Getty Images)

    Power in Rebellion's civil disobedience

    • Jacinta Bowler
    • 15 August 2019
    7 Comments

    Extinction Rebellion is the biggest environmental movement we've seen in Australia in years, and the group is well aware of the disruption they are causing — it's baked into their strategy. Is the inconvenience, disruption, and vitriol worth it? Is it actually going to turn public opinion one way or another? History suggests it just might.

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  • This cartoon by Chris Johnston contrasts two models depicting the year 2050. The model constructed by a child depicts nature benefiting from clean energy. The one by the adults shows nature choked by fossil fuels and broken nuclear power.

    Climate catastrophe and the irrational race

    • Megan Graham
    • 05 August 2019
    7 Comments

    The debate around climate change shows the danger in believing we humans are principally rational. History gives example after example of how our biases can make us do very irrational things. In the words of Dan Ariely, our species is 'predictably irrational'. It is helpful for us to know this, so that we can become better.

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  • Woman standing in an empty gallery (Paper Boat Creative / Getty)

    Restoring Australia's cultural ambition

    • Esther Anatolitis
    • 20 August 2019
    1 Comment

    At stake here is who takes responsibility for sector development in the arts as both a cultural and an economic good. Because right now, there is no national organisation or government agency whose role it is to take a responsible, long-term, national view, making sure there are programs in place to address key priorities.

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  • Hand holding a book (stock image / lechatnoir / Getty)

    Why people don’t read modern poetry

    • Thuy On and Francis Bede
    • 19 August 2019
    4 Comments

    What about compoundnounsthatrunlike this. Something here about the glory of native bush even tho you have never been beyond zone 3 on PT. Add doleful '....' Beckettian misery here. (Phew, your 20th century Lit Minor was not a waste!) So winning so woke you never even zzz.

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  • Sarah Hosking of the Carlton Blues tackles Jenna McCormick of the Adelaide Crows during the 2019 AFLW Grand Final at Adelaide Oval in March 2019. (Photo by James Elsby/AFL Photos/Getty Images)

    Women still fighting for territory in unequal AFL

    • Erin Riley
    • 19 August 2019

    The AFL's announcement that AFLX would be scrapped after two seasons, despite heavy media coverage, was a strong indication of the league's commitment to women's football. It now needs to follow up with commitments that reflect the increasing scale and importance of the women's competition to the league.

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