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Stations of the Cross reinterpreted

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Peter Kirkwood |  20 April 2011

Recent debate in the Australian Catholic Church over the new English translation of the Mass shows the difficulty of expressing age-old spiritual truths in contemporary language and symbols. An associated challenge is how to communicate with the broader culture about those truths in a way that's meaningful and enriching for all.

For the last five years at Easter, the Uniting Church at St Ives in Sydney's north has risen to this challenge. Led by minister Doug Purnell, this parish has commissioned leading contemporary artists to depict the Stations of the Cross. These representations of Christ's passion are then exhibited in the church over Easter, and used as a basis for lectures, discussion, prayer and reflection.

This spiritual practice is usually associated with Catholicism, and its origins generally attributed to St Francis. But Purnell explains that as the Stations of the Cross appeared in medieval times before the Reformation, it is a form of spirituality that 'belongs to all Christians', including Protestants.

In this special Easter interview for Eureka Street TV, Purnell shares his insights into some of the works in this year's exhibition. His enthusiasm is infectious, and he obviously has deep respect for the efforts of the artists as they grapple with expressing their particular episode.

(Continues below)

Purnell is well qualified to lead this exercise as he straddles the disciplines of art, ministry and theology. He's been minister at several Uniting Church parishes in Western Australia, Victoria and New South Wales, and has lectured in pastoral theology and the arts at a number of theological schools in Australia and the United States.

He gained his doctorate from San Francisco Theological Seminary with a thesis entitled 'Doing theology through expressive art', and is a practicing artist of some standing, with ten solo exhibitions and eight joint exhibitions held over the last ten years at various galleries in Australia and the USA.

He has been artist and scholar in residence at a number of prestigious institutions including the Andover Newton Theological School in Boston, St Mark's National Theological Centre in Canberra, Wesley Theological Seminary in Washington DC, and Princeton Theological Seminary in New Jersey.

He is a director on the board of the Blake Society for Contemporary Religious Art, and was one of the judges of the Blake Prize in 2004. He is in demand as a speaker, making regular presentations at conferences here and overseas.

He is a prolific writer, contributing chapters to a number of books, and articles to a range of journals. He has published several books including Working with Families, Exploring Your Family Story, Conversation as Ministry and, most recently, Being in Ministry: Honestly, Openly and Deeply. 


Peter KirkwoodPeter Kirkwood is a freelance writer and video consultant with a master's degree from the Sydney College of Divinity. 

 



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An extraordinary and perceptive commentary on quite stunning works of art which raises the level of mystery and grace in life

John Hill 21 April 2011

The whole of this exhibition is engaging, for the artists, for those of us who claim long familiarity with the Stations of the Cross and for those who encounter it as a thought provoking story. The artists give us a fresh non-dogmatic take on what really matters in the Gospel and life. Doug Purnell and his congregation have made a clear space here for contemplation. Thank you.

Alex Nelson 21 April 2011

As a faith explorer and art lover Peter Kirkwood's exploration of the stations of the cross was facinating. Artists given the biblical text - with no preconceptions. Can we ever get rid of all our preconceptions?

Jenny Esots 24 April 2011

I really enjoyed the video, the art and the reflections offered by Doug Purnell. Thank you Eureka Street TV.

Whilst Purnell was not in focus, which annoyed me, it gave me the opportunity to think about the people in the back ground of the video production. I interpreted them as 60+ in age.

How wonderful it is that at least one generation of Church goers are present and supportive of new and exciting interpretations of an age old narrative.

I do my best the encourage the girls I teach to 'be present' to new ways of looking at the Biblical stories, but it is sometimes an uphill battle.

Does anyone have any thoughts as to how I could enjoin these (and other) new, energised reflections with a generation of generally disengaged teenagers?

Ryan McBride

Ryan McBride 25 April 2011

I really enjoyed the video, the art and the reflections offered by Doug Purnell. Thank you Eureka Street TV.

Whilst Purnell was not in focus, which annoyed me, it gave me the opportunity to think about the people in the back ground of the video production. I interpreted them as 60+ in age.

How wonderful it is that at least one generation of Church goers are present and supportive of new and exciting interpretations of an age old narrative.

I do my best the encourage the girls I teach to 'be present' to new ways of looking at the Biblical stories, but it is sometimes an uphill battle.

Does anyone have any thoughts as to how I could enjoin these (and other) new, energised reflections with a generation of generally disengaged teenagers?

Ryan McBride

Ryan McBride 25 April 2011

I could not get to the stations of the cross exhibition this year, but I thoroughly enjoyed Doug Purnell's discussion of the artworks.The painting of Jesus' mother pointing her breast to her womb will give me thinking and reflection ideas during my next month of gardening/therapy time.

Susan Emeleus 29 April 2011