Volume 17 No.13

12 July 2007


 

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Evangelical Christianity enters the dreaming

    • Joanna Cruickshank
    • 25 July 2007
    1 Comment

    At a German mission in Victoria's Wimmera, a young Wotjobaluk man converted to Christianity in 1860. After a vision of Jesus sweating blood in Gethsemane, he began evangelising his people in their own language.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Don't just do something, sit there and listen

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 11 July 2007
    7 Comments

    The most telling questions about the PM's plan to fix Aboriginal communities focus on the involvement of the police and military. These reveal not just the absence of any broader strategy, but they also echo of the war metaphor that has been so prevalent over the past eleven years.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Further challenge to historical record on Aboriginal massacres

    • Tony Smith
    • 11 July 2007
    2 Comments

    A 19th century dispute over rights to whale on Victoria’s western coast saw a massacre of local Aboriginal people. The image of uniformed, white officers appearing in Aboriginal communities, supposedly to restore order and protect children, gives eerie timeliness to an uncompromising new account by Bruce Pascoe.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    "One true Church" lessons for John Howard

    • Michael Mullins
    • 11 July 2007
    2 Comments

    The largely Protestant World Council of Churches reacted favourably to this week's perceived "one true Church" declaration by the Roman Catholic Church, calling it an honest sharing of divergences that helps the cause of unity. There are lessons for the Federal Government, which should declare its alleged Northern Territory "land grab" to be such, and in the national interest.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Musharraf throws dice in bid to hold power

    • Suzanna Koster
    • 11 July 2007

    This week's operation against the radical clerics has prompted messages of support for Pakistan's General Musharraf from western allies. But in the eyes of the common Pakistanis the president has lost credibility forever.

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  • RELIGION

    Gentle Benedict concedes papal roadshow must go on

    • Paul Collins
    • 11 July 2007
    14 Comments

    Following earlier scepticism, Pope Benedict XVI last week confirmed that he is coming to Sydney for World Youth Day next July. Unlike his predecessor, he doesn't see himself as ‘bishop of the world’. Instead he has reasserted the traditional pastoral role of the pope as Bishop of Rome.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ten poems: From Woman in Bushfire to man in Sea of Tranquillity

    • Ten Poets
    • 11 July 2007

    The sound of the horse races is my father’s music / A soft dream hidden by ambition / take other paths or just stay put / silence(d) / beer and didgeredoo / the time it might take in getting home.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    JI's Al Qaeda link a myth

    • Dewi Anggraeni
    • 11 July 2007

    There may be ideological sympathy on the part of Indonesia's Jemaah Islamiyah for Al Qaeda, but there has been no direct affiliation between between the two groups since 2003. Al Qaeda, it seems, has dismissed JI as ineffectual—they keep getting caught.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    East Timor's continued uphill battle to secure a future

    • Paul Cleary
    • 11 July 2007
    3 Comments

    A potentially unstable coalition government with few detailed policies and weak administrative ability is now certain to emerge following the fragmented result in the recent election. But grounds for hope remain.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Apple's iPhone illustrates 'feature creep' scourge

    • James Massola
    • 11 July 2007
    4 Comments

    New features, whether we need them or not, have become the hook used to capture new customers. The past fortnight's scramble for the iPhone in the US has shown that consumers are only too willing to pay for features they will probably never need.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    History rises amidst film's humane depth

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 July 2007

    Lucky Miles is an outrageous buddy comedy set in 1990 in the Western Australian wilderness, with echoes of September 11, border security, and the totalitarian Indigenous intervention. This topicality borders on prophetic, as the film was conceived seven years ago.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Tariq Ali's Latin American "axis of hope"

    • Rodrigo Acuña
    • 11 July 2007

    Since 1998, the Bolivarian revolution in Venezuela has brought Hugo Chávez to world attention as a major challenge to American foreign policy in the region. Novelist and historian Tariq Ali sees a lot of positives, such as the Banco del Sur (Bank of the South) joint venture that involves six Latin American countries.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Government sincerity in NT communities requires questioning

    • Jonathan Hill
    • 11 July 2007
    19 Comments

    How does compulsory acquisition of land help abused children? It doesn’t. Public support for the Federal Government’s radical intervention sadly reflects the ignorance of white Australians.

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