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Flawed thinking that allows us to abuse animals

12 Comments
23 September 2014 | Valerie Wangnet

Pork chopsIn Ancient Greece, Hippocrates used the term 'hysteria' to account for emotional instability and mental illness in women. This is a diagnosis that survived up until the first sparks of the women's suffrage movement in mid–19th century. In the case of food animals, we are told that they cannot think, suffer or feel pain.


Our future is public

9 Comments
26 August 2014 | Andy Lynch

Archive photo of Melbourne Public LibraryThe kind of Australia we live in today can be directly attributed to the kinds of institutions built 150 years ago - schools, universities, libraries, museums, and more. But in 2014 is it even possible to carve out new public institutions or give new life to those that have waned in relevance?


Inequality matters

14 Comments
19 August 2014 | Harry Maher

Thomas Piketty's book Capital in the 21st Century

Inequality is dangerous. And inequality is at a near all-time high. At its core, the Government’s recent budget not only engenders but actively exults in the creation and maintenance of inequality, a phenomenon rapidly expanding not just in Australia, but around the world.


Sitting in the doors of the powerful

18 Comments
12 August 2014 | James O'Brien

'No Way' Immigration Department CampaignReligious leaders used methods of non-violent protest to respond to the Federal Government's 'No Way' campaign that aimed to discourage Afghan asylum seekers. Calling their movement 'Love Makes a Way', their strategy started to take shape: sit-ins in the electorate offices of federal parliamentarians, asking that justice may 'roll down like waters'. Nonviolent direct action changes hearts.


Margaret Dooley Award for Young Writers 2014

11 March 2014 | Staff

Vine, detail from Margaret Dooley 2014 bannerThe 2014 Margaret Dooley Award for Young Writers is open to submissions from 12 March 2014–18 July 2014. Prize money totalling $2000 to be won. Here are the submission guidelines.


Best of 2012: Catholic and Aboriginal 'listening revolutions'

4 Comments
09 January 2013 | Evan Ellis

The Rule of Benedict, landscape, sample from front coverSt Benedict of Nursia knew about living in a dying world. He was born 25 years after the Vandals sacked Rome and died months after the Ostrogoths had their turn. He watched as old certainties went up in flame. As existing institutions were hollowed out or winnowed completely, Benedict started a revolution. Wednesday 12 September 


The just world fallacy and the need for empathy

5 Comments
25 September 2012 | Sarah Burnside

Clasped hands painted to look like earthHuman beings have a bias towards a belief that the world is a fair place in which one's actions have appropriate consequences. This 'just world hypothesis' implies that those who suffer calamity must be at fault. It is the opposite of empathy and poses a serious challenge for those who seek to implement progressive social policies.


Disability, sex rights and the prostitute

30 Comments
18 September 2012 | Matthew Holloway

Disability and sex iconAustralia is seeing a divisive battle between those who oppose people being forced into sex work, and those who advocate for the right of people with disabilities to access sex workers. It is hard to see justice in a situation where one disadvantaged group needs to stay disadvantaged in order to service another disadvantaged group.


Catholic and Aboriginal 'listening revolutions'

12 Comments
11 September 2012 | Evan Ellis

The Rule of Benedict, landscape, sample from front coverSt Benedict of Nursia knew about living in a dying world. He was born 25 years after the Vandals sacked Rome and died months after the Ostrogoths had their turn. He watched as old certainties went up in flame. As existing institutions were hollowed out or winnowed completely, Benedict started a revolution.


Inhaling God

1 Comment
13 September 2011 | Jessica Voelker

Breath on a cold morningOne American physicist claims each breath we take contains molecules of air that were also breathed by Archimedes, Aristotle, and even Jesus Christ. Through physics, religion, the human body, and mythology, there is a thread that weaves us into a continuous rich tapestry.


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