Search Results: plastic

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    Russia's Soviet nostalgia trip

    • Colin Long
    • 07 July 2009
    15 Comments

    It is strange to see so many symbols of the Soviet past alive and well in Russia. It is too simplistic to say this reflects nostalgia for Soviet times. Much of it is personal nostalgia. The intertwining of private and public memory is complex.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Michael Jackson's tragic gift

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 June 2009
    6 Comments

    When celebrities die, public grief is disproportionate, because death reasserts the humanity of one who has seemed beyond it. Jackson had become so far removed from his humanity that the shock of his mortality is even more profound.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Machiavelli and the jam-makers

    • Anna Griffiths
    • 27 May 2009

    Machiavelli would surely have loved the complex political environment of the community garden. We would have welcomed him on the evening we turned up to strip the apricot tree and conduct a community jam session.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Affectionate portraits of 'the outsider'

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 02 April 2009
    13 Comments

    Mary is a socially awkward adolescent, growing up in 1970s suburban Melbourne. Her penpal Max is a lonely New Yorker, a chronic overeater with Asperger's. Adam Elliot's films are not just about difference. They are about justice.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Grand Prix: anniversary for a meaningless death

    • Roger Trowbridge
    • 25 March 2009
    2 Comments

    Dennis was the neighbourhood character. Full of good humour, he had a capacity for quipping his way through life — no one out-quipped Dennis. One day Dennis went to the Grand Prix. That evening he did not come home.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Towards a carbon dictatorship

    • Michael Mullins
    • 16 March 2009
    17 Comments

    A business-friendly carbon emissions reduction scheme is an oxymoron. The draconian action which the Government must take will lead to further unemployment and short-term damage to the fabric of society. But there is no choice.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Why humans rule the world

    • Jen Vuk
    • 06 March 2009

    Science journalist Hannah Holmes turns a cool, scientific eye back on us, reminding us of our mammalian origins and bringing us down to size. 'Knobby', pink-skinned and ludicrously top heavy, our peculiarity is also the key to our success.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Art and the Piss Christ umbrella

    • Jessica Frawley
    • 02 March 2009
    8 Comments

    Paintings that once would have once sparked controversy now adorn biscuit tins, umbrellas, notebooks and a range of other merchandise. We have killed the controversy and challenges faced in the past by branding it to death.

    READ MORE
  • ECONOMICS

    The chuckling economist

    • Brownyn Lay
    • 05 January 2009
    3 Comments

    On the day the markets bled we rushed to hear Stiglitz's diagnosis. The Nobel Laureate used to be Chief Economist of the World Bank, ending his term in fisty cuffs with the IMF and the US over their financial bullying of developing nations. Stiglitz had schadenfreude written all over his face. (October 2008)

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Confessions of a videogame junkie

    • Ben O'Mara
    • 15 December 2008
    2 Comments

    I spent untold hours playing on my Commodore 64. I upgraded to a PC, to fight the beasties of Duke Nukem 3D as I chugged too many coffees and Mars bars. Interactivity is videogames' strength, and can be applied in socially constructive ways for marginalised communities.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    The nun and the burqa

    • Bronwyn Lay
    • 02 December 2008
    20 Comments

    When Germaine Greer savaged Michelle Obama's dress, I sighed. The 'beauty' market is a challenge to feminism. In France, two extremes of fashion ideology — burqas and plastic-surgery 'mannequins' — line up to buy bread.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    The skeleton dance

    • Margaret Cody
    • 31 October 2008
    2 Comments

    Mexico's Día de los Muertos, the Day of the Dead, is not a gloomy celebration, it is a recognition of death as part of life. Skeletons lean precariously out of every doorway and window, smiling, bejewelled and ready for the party.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review