Search Results: humour

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Melbourne's Gen Y hollowman

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 15 February 2012
    1 Comment

    The 'quarter life crisis' is perhaps a Gen Y phenomenon where, despite a dedication to 'experience' and 'connection', one feels life is hollow. The greatest weakness of Any Questions For Ben? is that it offers pat answers to existential questions, where perhaps it should offer none. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The beer jingle that saved Christmas

    • Brian Doyle
    • 21 December 2011
    1 Comment

    A hickory tree peed his pants. A striped bass assaulted an eggplant. A teacher cursed in Gaelic into her mic. Then my kid brother, Tommy, spontaneously stepped forward and sang that jingle. Some moments are unforgettable for reasons we can't articulate. My dad says he'll savour that one on his deathbed. 

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  • RELIGION

    Missing Christopher Hitchens

    • Frank Brennan
    • 19 December 2011
    25 Comments

    We'll miss his intellectual rigour, self-deprecating humour, unpredictable political perspectives, unforgiving character evaluations, and iconoclastic appetite for scrutiny and transparency — even those of us appalled by his vicious and discriminatory anti-religious bigotry. 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The good journalist and the assassins

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 11 December 2011
    17 Comments

    In Australia free speech is understood as freedom from legal constraint. In the Bolt case, it was defended for commercial reasons. A better understanding of the cost of free speech can be seen in Russian journalist Alexander Minkin's description of an attempt to kill him.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Pope on the run

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 07 December 2011
    3 Comments

    The Catholic Church has more than a billion members worldwide. To lead it is an immense responsibility. Irreverence notwithstanding, We Have A Pope stands as a gracious gesture, free of Church politics, to those who accept that responsibility. Surely, none would do so blithely.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Death by a thousand yuppies

    • Ellena Savage
    • 24 November 2011
    2 Comments

    Pubs with boutique beer are creeping their way north. Day-old bread at the café where the yummy mummies drink lattes is $4. Gentrification. The cycle of life. I want to save my heartland from this fate, but I should first register my own complicity. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aboriginal community ditched by church and state

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 23 November 2011
    8 Comments

    The remote community of Toomelah was a state-run Aboriginal mission with a strong church presence. A raft of social problems have emerged in place of the traditional culture that was usurped by these influences. Cultural extinction is perhaps the biggest issue facing such communities.

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  • MEDIA

    Peter Roebuck's ordered passion for cricket

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 14 November 2011
    11 Comments

    As a cricket writer Roebuck appreciated that other things in life matter more than sport. But precisely because sport does not matter ultimately, he was freed to take it very seriously indeed.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Modernising Islam

    • William Gourlay
    • 17 October 2011
    16 Comments

    First appearing in 1906, the islamic periodical Molla Nasreddin displayed a sardonic and satirical take on women's rights, the role of religion in society and government, press freedom and education. The Arab Spring is the latest expression of this forestalled progressive sentiment.

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  • MEDIA

    Abbott's budgie-smuggler blues

    • Moira Byrne Garton
    • 18 August 2011
    12 Comments

    Politicians are always pitilessly represented in cartoons. Just ask Kevin 'Tintin' Rudd and Julia 'Nose' (or 'Bottom') Gillard. Portrayals of Tony Abbott in Speedos are not part of a plot to undermine him. The public is able to recognise cartoons as exaggerated political commentary.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    We don't own Amy Winehouse

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 27 July 2011
    4 Comments

    It sometimes seems celebrities are public property. News of the death of British singer Amy Winehouse was met with both grief and jokes. Hearing her father Mitch speak of her as any father would about a child who has died prematurely, grounds her.

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  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    The ethics of getting a job

    • Patrick McCabe
    • 26 July 2011
    11 Comments

    Ignatius of Loyola and Michel de Montaigne both had privileged upbringings. But where Montaigne was committed to personal fulfillment, Loyala was devoted to service. I, too, had a privileged upbrining and education. I'm not yet sure whose example is best to follow. 

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