Search Results: South East Asia

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    Respect for politicians who represent all of us is crucial

    • Frank Brennan
    • 12 September 2007
    8 Comments

    I agree with the New South Wales bishops that persons with respect for human life should vote against stem cell legislation. However, I will continue to respect the conscience of those politicians who say that they have to legislate for all citizens including those who do not share their religious and philosophical presuppositions.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Musharraf throws dice in bid to hold power

    • Suzanna Koster
    • 11 July 2007

    This week's operation against the radical clerics has prompted messages of support for Pakistan's General Musharraf from western allies. But in the eyes of the common Pakistanis the president has lost credibility forever.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    JI's Al Qaeda link a myth

    • Dewi Anggraeni
    • 11 July 2007

    There may be ideological sympathy on the part of Indonesia's Jemaah Islamiyah for Al Qaeda, but there has been no direct affiliation between between the two groups since 2003. Al Qaeda, it seems, has dismissed JI as ineffectual—they keep getting caught.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Anti-corruption measures eclipse human rights in Cambodia

    • Allister Hayman
    • 27 June 2007
    1 Comment

    Despite mounting criticism of the human rights record of Cambodian Prime Minister Hun Sen, foreign donors, including Australia, continue to back him financially. It seems that the economic growth and stability he has fostered is more valuable than transparency, the rule of law, and human rights.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Reviving the domino theory

    • Daniel Baldino
    • 18 May 2007
    1 Comment

    The notion of preventing Islamic influence has strong echoes of the simple Cold War ‘domino theory’. This powerful metaphor and enemy image, popular in the 1950s and 1960s and used to justify US military intervention in Southeast Asia, was later widely criticised for its undeveloped and unstructured generalisations about political systems that are quite different.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The party’s over

    • Joseph Camilleri
    • 18 May 2007

    In light of the federal election, Joe Camilleri considers the questions that have yet to be asked

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Charting a course for the Philippines

    • Fatima Measham
    • 18 May 2007

    Fatima Measham investigates the declining credibility of Filipino President Gloria Arroyo.

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  • CONTRIBUTORS

    Jan Forrester

    • Jan Forrester
    • 17 May 2007

    Jan Forrester is a freelance journalist and media consultant who has worked in radio in metropolitan and regional Australia and in press, media training and consultancy in South East Asia. She was a member of the National Indigenous TV Committee, a voluntary group tasked by the Minister for Communications, Information Telecommunications and Arts, with implementing the establishment of a National Indigenous Television service.  

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  • CONTRIBUTORS

    Elizabeth Ascroft

    • Elizabeth Ascroft
    • 17 May 2007

    Elizabeth is a Melbourne based freelance writer, with a special interest in South-East Asia where she has both lived and travelled extensively.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Keneally's mature insights into character

    • Tony Smith
    • 15 May 2007

    To the extent that novels exist to provide insights into character, minds and decisions, Tom Keneally's new novel is arguably his best.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Explaining anti-Chinese sentiment in Indonesia

    • Dewi Anggraeni
    • 27 February 2007

    In the 1990s, Soeharto and his ministers were renting their power to business-savvy ethnic Chinese. The masses, unable to vent their anger at corrupt officials, shifted their targets to those associated with them, knowing that they could do that with impunity.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Slow progress with North Korea is better than no progress

    • Joseph Camilleri
    • 30 October 2006
    8 Comments

    The North Korean regime is more likely to be loosened from its present grip on power by the slow but persistent attempts to change the economic and psychological landscape inside North Korea, than by the external application of brute force.

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