Search Results: grief

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Roasts and race in segregated South Africa

    • Cecile Yazbek
    • 25 October 2011
    1 Comment

    Anthony cleans gutters. Some people give him money. When he has enough he buys himself a piece of chicken. 'Where is your mother,' I wonder, 'who roasted fat chickens in our oven, and cooked giant pots of meaty bones for our dogs, her brown arms pitted with burns from our kettles?'

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Even Gaddafi deserves compassion

    • Michael Mullins
    • 23 October 2011
    17 Comments

    Gaddafi undoubtedly suffered from some form of mental illness that had unspeakably tragic consequences for the people of Libya. The jubilation of Libyans is understandable, but the country will not prosper while Gaddafi supporters remain antagonised and the country divided.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Race against grief

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 19 October 2011

    In 2002, jockey Damien Oliver rode to Melbourne Cup glory, one week after his brother, Jason, was killed in a racing incident. The Cup, a paean to the Golden Age of Australian cinema, recreates the tragic and inspirational events in style. 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    What was left behind

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 08 September 2011
    2 Comments

    A soft toy. A restaurant menu. A business card. An agony so great it swamped the world. While America was busy hunting down Osama bin Laden, my son and his contemporaries, who were children at the time of the attack, grew up and inherited a world irrevocably changed. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Alice Springs drinking stories

    • Ellena Savage
    • 18 August 2011
    3 Comments

    On my last night in Alice, we went to the pub, and drank and danced with some locals. Patricia, for whom English was a fourth language, had moved to Alice to be with her husband. Her manner of speech was beautiful. When she invited us to her table, she said, 'Come, I'll tell you a story.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    We don't own Amy Winehouse

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 27 July 2011
    4 Comments

    It sometimes seems celebrities are public property. News of the death of British singer Amy Winehouse was met with both grief and jokes. Hearing her father Mitch speak of her as any father would about a child who has died prematurely, grounds her.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The moral challenge of accepting an apology

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 25 May 2011
    6 Comments

    Often the reconciliation debate is framed around matters of the perpetrator's reaction, rather than that of the victim, who holds a superior moral currency. Could it be ever feasible for Australia's Indigenous community to countenance unconditional forgiveness?

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  • RELIGION

    Human faces of Toowoomba conflict

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 02 May 2011
    69 Comments

    Bishop Bill Morris' announcement that he had tendered his early retirement under Roman pressure will arouse debate in and outside the Catholic Church. In these first days of controversy, it may be helpful first to reflect on the impact that the action has on the people most affected by it.

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  • RELIGION

    Uncomfortable Easter and Anzac Day

    • Andrew Hamilon
    • 20 April 2011
    10 Comments

    Good intentions are not sufficient to give life meaning. Easter's significance comes not from Jesus' choice to die, but in God's gift of raising him from the dead. In the Anzac story, it may be comforting to say young soldiers died that others may live, but the comfort is too easy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Gospel truths in children's stories

    • Various
    • 22 March 2011

    What's more unfeasible? The dim prospect of churches selling off real estate to house and feed and clothe the homeless, or elephants, webskidding with zeal?

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Blame detention centres, not detainees

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 21 March 2011
    37 Comments

    Those who defend the humanity of asylum seekers are often dismissed as bleeding hearts. It is tempting to respond by referring to those who defend the existing regime of detention as bleeding minds. The recent events in remote detention centres are deplorable, but predictable.

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  • RELIGION

    Japan's gods of nature

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 21 March 2011
    5 Comments

    In Japan's relief centres and obliterated streets, there is no news of looting or violence, no shouts of blame, no demands for immediate evacuation and coronial inquests. 'Shinto is a nature religion,' says my guide Yoshiko. 'We give thanks to everything we have.'

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