Search Results: film review

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Indian cinema beyond Bollywood

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 27 August 2009

    Joseph Pulinthanath's film cost less than the costume budget for a Bollywood film. His encounters with the peoples of the 'anthropologist's paradise' that is North-East India drove him to respond to injustice in the region.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Discerning truth in Balibo's fiction

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 20 August 2009
    5 Comments

    'Cinema,' says director Robert Connolly, 'can take the audience and show them a tragedy in a way that creates empathy. I was interested in exploring the ability of this country to compel people to tell its story. It's hard not to start caring for what happened there.'

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    How Balibo distorts history

    • Paul Cleary
    • 20 August 2009
    10 Comments

    The first feature length film about Indonesia's invasion of East Timor and the deaths of six Australian journalists fails to inform the audience of the diplomatic dirty tricks, and Australian and American complicity.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The gospel according to John Hughes

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 August 2009
    4 Comments

    I don't use the word gospel lightly. Here was a secular film that extrapolated, in teenagers' language, the notion of 'love thy neighbour'. Filmmaker John Hughes died last week. The Breakfast Club remains his masterpiece.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Incest and redemption

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 06 August 2009
    5 Comments

    The publicity poster for Beautiful Kate is as ambiguous as the controversial Bill Henson photographs it so blatantly references. The film unpacks these ambiguities, not solving but exacerbating them and making them sing with empathy.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Stupid men in a brutal land

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 23 July 2009

    Australia, 1902. One year since Federation. The nation is a sickly child, as yet unaware of its weakness. The colonisers deceive themselves into thinking they can tame the land. A century later, not much has changed.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Who hates Harry Potter

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 16 July 2009
    4 Comments

    The rule seems to be that one's attitude to Harry Potter should be either obsession, derision, or total lack of interest. If that's true, I'm in a minority: I am an equivocal fan. A few of the books are great. At least one is bloody awful. The movies are similarly hit-and-miss.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    How Rafters had its pro-choice cake and ate it too

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 09 July 2009
    5 Comments

    When Julie learned she was pregnant, Dave advocated termination. Julie could see his logic, but was also overcome by powerful mothering urges. The writers of Packed to the Rafters are adept at unpacking every skerrick of emotional baggage.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Masterchef cooks up fine reality trash

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 02 July 2009
    6 Comments

    The original UK Masterchef is the pinnacle of reality TV. Masterchef Australia is the theme park version, sacrificing excellence to entertainment. It may be a different beast to its predecessor, but it's not all bad, either.

    READ MORE
  • EUREKA STREET TV

    New ethics of new media

    • Peter Kirkwood
    • 02 July 2009

    The video featured on this page is a substandard, pirated copy of an artist's work, posted on YouTube. For most of us, it's the only means of seeing some of the most celebrated work of one of Australia's leading emerging artists.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Michael Jackson's tragic gift

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 June 2009
    6 Comments

    When celebrities die, public grief is disproportionate, because death reasserts the humanity of one who has seemed beyond it. Jackson had become so far removed from his humanity that the shock of his mortality is even more profound.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Indigenous Robin Hood's just desserts

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 25 June 2009
    6 Comments

    Jack Charles is an Aboriginal elder, professional actor and part-time criminal. He describes his acts of burglary as 'collecting the rent' from white suburbanites who dwell on what could rightfully be considered Aboriginal land.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review