Search Results: World Environment Day

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • RELIGION

    Leading in diverse times

    • Frank Brennan
    • 16 July 2018
    3 Comments

    'Kristina Keneally was unapologetic in putting the place of women in our church front and centre. And so we should.' Tropical and Topical, 2018 National Catholic Principals' Conference, Cairns Convention Centre, 16 July 2018.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Us and them: reconceiving trees

    • Cristy Clark
    • 04 July 2018
    8 Comments

    Grieving the death of a tree seems a common experience, but I had rarely heard about it. We share stories of the loss of loved ones or pets, but not of specific trees. Are we less comfortable acknowledging the depth of this relationship? Does it challenge our cultural understanding of the natural world and our place within it?

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Will veganism save the planet?

    • Cristy Clark
    • 08 June 2018
    13 Comments

    Researchers from Oxford concluded that consumers have significant power to 'deliver environmental benefits on a scale not achievable by producers' by excluding animal products from their diets. Interestingly, this report comes at a time when the uptake of veganism is growing significantly, both globally and in Australia.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    Karl Marx would find no home in modern China

    • Mark Hearn
    • 21 May 2018
    15 Comments

    On recent the bicentenary of Marx's birth, Chinese President Xi Jinping declared that the Communist Party 'has combined the fundamental principles of Marxism with the reality of China's reform and opening up'. In reality China's economic system bears no resemblance to the revolutionary overthrow of capitalism advocated by Marx.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Budget's arts flagship is, well, a flagship

    • Esther Anatolitis
    • 09 May 2018
    9 Comments

    The flagship cultural measure in the budget is, strangely, a flagship: the Endeavour. The government announced '$48.7 million over four years to commemorate the 250th anniversary of James Cook's first voyage to Australia and the Pacific'. A permanent presence on the first site of local trauma is not a vision for a nation.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    What comes next for surveillance capitalism?

    • Lizzie O'Shea
    • 16 April 2018
    3 Comments

    Whether Facebook fails or succeeds beyond the Cambridge Analytica scandal is somewhat beside the point - we are finally starting to have discussions about the desirability of their business model. Because of course, Facebook is not the only company that strip mines data with almost sociopathic disinterest.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Running with the wolves of charity street

    • Luke Timp
    • 13 April 2018
    9 Comments

    The spectacle would be funny if so many people didn't partake in and enjoy it. It feels cartoonish, like a Wolf of Wall Street where 30 Jordan Belforts compete to be the top salesperson. Instead of Wall Street glitz, the fortune we compete for is made by selling raffle tickets for charities.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Another page torn from the glossary of life

    • Fatima Measham
    • 29 March 2018
    10 Comments

    The last male northern white rhinoceros was euthanased in March. With two females still alive, there is hope the subspecies might be saved. The impending loss of an animal that evolved over six million years, and once grazed in hundreds of thousands, is worth noting. There can be room in our hearts to lament.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Climate champion SA Labor's dark stain

    • Greg Foyster
    • 16 March 2018
    5 Comments

    The complexity of environmental policy in SA echoes a broader trend in environment issues: climate change has monopolised the debate, squeezing out local conservation concerns. The upshot is a Left-leaning government can be progressive on clean energy, while holding a regressive stance on less prominent topics.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    God in the cell

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 16 March 2018
    2 Comments

    Kane insists God doesn't make mistakes: 'That's what makes him God.' Lena retorts with reference to the Hayflick limit — the naturally occurring limit on the number of times cells can divide. Never mind cancer; the very fact of ageing, she says, comes down to a flaw in our DNA. It's a telling scene, pointing to a scientifically enlightened humanity at odds with its own physiology.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Greek village rides the rise and fall of plastic

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 09 March 2018
    7 Comments

    Yiayia Aphrodite always practised frugality. She cut old dresses into strips and wove cotton rugs out of them, and used matches twice if she could. When plastic bags came into supermarkets, she immediately made use of them: I think every house in the neighbourhood received presents of circular blue and orange bathmats and doormats.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    Refugee inventors prove the power of education

    • David Holdcroft
    • 26 February 2018
    5 Comments

    Louise, Aline and Kapinga are hardly household names in Australia. They are better known in Malawi, having received the prestigious Scientific and Technological Innovation Award at the Malawian National Schools Science Fair. Aline and Kapinga are all refugees residing at Malawi's Dzaleka Refugee Camp.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up