Search Results: aged care

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Being sick in Australia is harder than ever

    • El Gibbs
    • 28 May 2018
    2 Comments

    I first got sick when I was 19. I am now in my 40s and still sick. I have tried myriad medications and treatments, and live with a now permanent disability. The public systems I have engaged with over this time have become increasingly adversarial. The gaps between systems are getting wider, and the expenses higher.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Stigmatising those in need is a grubby game

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 22 May 2018
    8 Comments

    These initiatives are sideshows, grubby and voyeuristic. They mask the simple truth: that governments have the duty to respect people as human beings and not ciphers, to provide benefits that help people to live with self-respect, to take responsibility for the disadvantage of Indigenous Australians and to involve them in its healing.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A heartbreaking tribute to the work mothers do

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 15 May 2018
    2 Comments

    Tully is a funny film, with a serious core: a tribute to the labour of child rearing, a dissection of the substantial physical and emotional burden of this work, and a 'show-don't-tell' critique of the social norms that frequently sees that burden fall, still, primarily on women.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Whose health matters?

    • El Gibbs
    • 14 May 2018
    6 Comments

    Health spending takes up a significant amount of federal and state government spending. But is this to keep Australians healthy, or to treat us when we get sick? The budget was a missed opportunity to invest in preventative health measures, and to fix health inequalities through policies informed by the social determinants of health.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Gods, emperors and the ritual of federal budgets

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 11 May 2018
    2 Comments

    On the surface budgets are exercises in financial accountability. At a deeper level they are best understood as a yearly ritual; one of the ways in which rulers acknowledge and try to manipulate truths about state power. We should evaluate these less on their stated intentions but with what the show of competence and generosity reveals.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Tax cuts good politics, but not good policy

    • Joe Zabar
    • 11 May 2018
    2 Comments

    The proposed tax cuts will create long-term structural changes to government revenue sources, which may prove to be economic folly in future-proofing Australia against global economic shocks, and in dealing with current unmet needs of poor and vulnerable Australians.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    The fight to make water a human right

    • Cristy Clark
    • 02 May 2018
    2 Comments

    In 2010, the UN General Assembly and Human Rights Council recognised a human right to water, guaranteeing access for everyone to 'sufficient, safe, acceptable, physically accessible and affordable water for personal and domestic uses'. Eight years on, it is past time that Australia incorporated this right into domestic law.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A parent's guide to pop culture diversity

    • Fatima Measham
    • 25 April 2018
    3 Comments

    The moment in Power Rangers when Cam Watanabe turned into the Green Samurai, I looked at my son's face and could sense what it meant to him. Pop culture validates or marginalises, depending on who is in the frame. Who gets to be seen and heard, and under what circumstances, are political decisions, whether consciously or not.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Thirst for righteousness over Aboriginal deaths

    • Michele Madigan
    • 23 April 2018
    13 Comments

    Commemorating the 25th anniversary of the Royal Commission into Aboriginal Deaths in Custody, NITV re-screened Richard Frankland's 1993 documentary Who Killed Malcolm Smith? Watching it, it became totally clear to me about Manus Island and Nauru. Perhaps as a nation this violence, this contempt of the 'other', is in our DNA.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Remembering shared humanity on Anzac Day

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 22 April 2018
    22 Comments

    The tension between remembering those who died and celebrating those who fought makes the celebration of Anzac Day inherently controversial. It is seen by many to canonise military values. But the risk is less to glorify war than to sanitise it by allowing time and space to take away its physical reality, and with it the sadness of war.

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  • RELIGION

    No liberation without Palestinian liberation

    • Na'ama Carlin
    • 15 April 2018
    7 Comments

    While Jews around the world celebrated Passover, other people protested their right to return home, as the Palestinian 'Great March of Return' was launched on the Gaza Strip. The night that Jews globally celebrated freedom, 19 Palestinians were killed and over 1000 injured because they rightfully demanded theirs.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Clay feet

    • Barry Gittins
    • 15 April 2018
    1 Comment

    Mohandas was a lawyer and a saviour, who took his beatin's and refused to eat; Mahatma won, the Union Jack was flaggin’, then one of his own dropped Gandhi at his feet. Jesus was a rabbi and a dreamer, who talked and stirred and gave up carpentry; Mary cried as spearpoint slid past femur, godson egressed into mystery.

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