Search Results: space exploration

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Seductive melancholy of a poet's last works

    • Carolyn Masel
    • 03 April 2009

    Vincent Buckley's work evolves from the explicitly religious to the exploration of experience. But when individual and common experience of love, suffering, or conflict is treated with such depth of seriousness, the result is much the same.

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  • EUREKA STREET/ READER'S FEAST AWARD

    Eureka Street/Reader's Feast and Margaret Dooley Awards 2009

    • Staff
    • 22 March 2009

    Submission guidelines for the Eureka Street/Reader's Feast and Margaret Dooley Awards 2009 are now online.

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  • EDUCATION

    Why the Melbourne Model is failing students

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 12 December 2008
    5 Comments

    Widespread subject cuts and reductions in staff numbers have eaten away at students' plans and rendered the new breadth component impotent. Horizons seem to be shrinking, which makes it increasingly difficult to 'dream large'.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why Aussie pollies are crumby speakers

    • Sarah Kanowski
    • 30 October 2008
    9 Comments

    Where Obama waxed lyrical about kings and pioneers, Rudd rhymed clumsily about Iced Vo Vos and getting on with the job. Australians don't do magnificence, and our national 'shyness' is nowhere clearer than in our political rhetoric.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Spanish chiller evokes ghosts of grief

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 May 2008

    The supernatural elements in The Orphanage provide an allegory for Laura's grief for her lost son. But it's the tangible, human elements that will leave both mind and gut churning late into the night. Be prepared to lose sleep.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Truth about Aboriginal missions requires study

    • Robin Koning
    • 24 January 2008
    14 Comments

    Too often, generic statements about missionaries colluding with colonialism and destroying indigenous cultures are presumed to say all that needs to be said. Detailed study of mission history is essential if we are to move beyond the clichés.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

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  • RELIGION

    How to find God in ordinary human hope

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 12 December 2007
    2 Comments

    Pope Benedict's encyclical Spe Salvi assumes the fragmentation of hope in today's world will not be addressed simply by the secular world adding God to its limited hopes. Instead it involves the nurturing of a Christian imagination that overcomes the breach between divine and human.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Triumph of the tree huggers

    • Tim Thwaites
    • 27 February 2007

    In the past six months, climate change has gone from an idea which may have some future relevance to something which is already happening around us. Each region of the world seems to have had its own epiphany over climate change.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Putting soul into climate change debate

    • Kent Rosenthal
    • 27 February 2007
    1 Comment

    When multinationals and politicians seem to be looking the other way in the face of an impending climate change crisis, it’s good to know there are people out there pushing for reform and stirring debate at the highest levels. 

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Military power no way to uphold human dignity

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 24 December 2006

    Suicide bombing, kidnapping and rocket attacks are morally indefensible. They commonly demean the humanity of those who indulge in them and those who suffer them. From 25 July 2006.

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  • RELIGION

    A wide Brown land shaking off its collective memory

    • Brian Matthews
    • 23 December 2006

    In a country which periodically agonises its way through debates about its history and frets regularly about the quality of history teaching, it is remarkable how resistant we are to embedding notes and pointers on our past in the urban and rural landscapes.

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