Search Results: National Gallery of Australia

  • AUSTRALIA

    A Shakespearean view of Australian politics

    • Adrian Phoon
    • 26 July 2010
    2 Comments

    Malcolm Turnbull recently compared Kevin Rudd to the Shakespearean character Coriolanus, a reviled control freak. Politicians sometimes invoke Shakespeare to flatter their own cause. But this is fraught with dangers: they can come off sounding pompous, or their analogies may backfire.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Cate Blanchett, Peter Garrett and other endangered creatures

    • Brian Matthews
    • 25 March 2010
    5 Comments

    Few people give a toss about Bilbies, the Arts or Heritage, but the moment someone rediscovers them and deems them indispensable, only to find that Bilbies are disappearing and Arts and Heritage are in palliative care, Garrett's a goner — again.

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  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    Aurin: a parable of inter-faith friendship

    • Cara Munro
    • 24 July 2009
    6 Comments

    Multi-faith dialogue is just a conversation, over time, between dear friends.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Irish, prisoners of a sacred past

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 17 March 2009
    5 Comments

    St Patrick holds the Irish in a powerful emotional thrall. Parades all over the world honour the man who brought Christianity to Ireland. This week in Northern Ireland, saintly ghosts of the past have been called upon to bless murder.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Art and the Piss Christ umbrella

    • Jessica Frawley
    • 02 March 2009
    8 Comments

    Paintings that once would have once sparked controversy now adorn biscuit tins, umbrellas, notebooks and a range of other merchandise. We have killed the controversy and challenges faced in the past by branding it to death.

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  • RELIGION

    Killing people for killing people

    • Frank Brennan
    • 17 October 2008
    9 Comments

    'For me, talk of the death penalty evoked the young, frightened faces of Scott and Emmanuel, as well as the laughing, haughty faces of Amrozi, Mukhlas and Imam Samudra.' Full text from Frank Brennan's session on 'Killing People for Killing People', Ubud Writers Festival, 17 October 2008.

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  • RELIGION

    Educating leaders for the contemporary Australian Church

    • Frank Brennan
    • 06 October 2008

    'Lee and Christine Rush are your average Ozzie couple, except that their teenage son Scott is on death row in Bali having been convicted of being a hapless drug mule. It will not go down well on the streets of Jakarta if Australians are baying for the blood of the Bali bombers one month and then pleading to save our sons and daughters the next month.'

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  • EUREKA STREET/ READER'S FEAST AWARD

    SIEV X, the boat that sank

    • Tony Kevin
    • 30 July 2008
    6 Comments

    Coming closer, one sees these are paintings of drowning people, headsor bodies suspended in metallic seawater. There are 353 images, mostly children and women, for it was mostly children and women who boarded the boat.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sonnet for a city

    • Various
    • 03 June 2008

    Water colour petals grow into a crowd .. They populate the dustproof draft of an afternoon under the offices .. a saint shall guide anyone towards a meditation on the whole picture .. the Central Business District.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Photographic statements from a Mumbai slum

    • Ian Woolverton
    • 09 April 2008
    4 Comments

    Apnalaya, a Mumbai-based non government organisation that works with slum dwellers, commissioned Melbourne photographer Ian Woolverton to create a photo essay of scenes from Mumbai. Eureka Street presents a selection of images from this powerful essay.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Childlike wonder redeems inscrutable Houdini

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 March 2008

    Tough times call for tough measures — the McGarvie women comprise a single-parent family in a male-dominated society, so you can hardly blame them for making a living the best way they can. Houdini is all charm and showmanship, with hidden depths and dark secrets.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The cultural heritage cost of Kakadu tourism

    • Colin Long
    • 05 February 2008
    2 Comments

    From Ubirr, the wetlands, verdant and abundant with birdlife, stretch to the fringing escarpment. In a place so full of the beauties of nature, one feels keenly the absence of its traditional owners. For Australian and overseas visitors to experience this view, they lost their land.

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