Search Results: judiciary

  • AUSTRALIA

    Hey hey it's a human rights violation

    • Michael Mullins
    • 12 October 2009
    20 Comments

    A majority of Australians seem to view the Black Faces segment on Hey Hey as benign, at worst. A Human Rights Charter might amplify the voice of the Koori woman who called a talkback radio station to say the segment had undermined her sense of equality.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    The most expensive bananas in Thailand

    • Harry Nicolaides
    • 09 June 2009
    7 Comments

    Harry Nicolaides was a prisoner at Bangkok Remand Prison from September 2008 to February 2009, held on charges of lèse majesté. There he met Benny Moafi, who is serving a 22-year sentence for a crime he did not commit.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Eyewitness to Pakistan turmoil

    • Reuben Brand
    • 23 March 2009
    5 Comments

    The streets of Rawalpindi were now relatively empty, an eerie feeling in a usually bustling city. After slipping past police checkpoints I noticed the city was not completely still. Groups of men roamed the streets, patiently waiting for the call to action.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Corruption may undermine Khmer Rouge justice

    • Sebastian Strangio
    • 23 February 2009
    1 Comment

    It was a momentous event: a senior leader of the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime standing trial in a court of law. The Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia has set itself a mandate that goes far beyond rendering impartial verdicts.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    Terrorism trial's legacy of fairness

    • James Montgomery
    • 09 December 2008
    5 Comments

    A landmark ruling in Victoria's 'terrorism trial' found the accused were subjected to oppressive conditions beyond what prisoners on remand should endure. It's as if they were to be punished prior to the outcome of the trial, irrespective of the jury verdict.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Thai airport protesters' victory short-lived

    • Nicholas Farrelly and Andrew Walker
    • 04 December 2008

    The protesters who occupied Bangkok's airports are claiming victory in their political battle, following the Constitutional Court's dissolution of the ruling party. But this is far from the end. The government is down, but not out.

    READ MORE
  • EUREKA STREET/ READER'S FEAST AWARD

    Something rotten in Islam

    • Irfan Yusuf
    • 22 October 2008
    12 Comments

    When a Muslim woman was kidnapped by the Byzantine empire, the Caliph in Baghdad threatened to send a vast army to rescue her. Today, Muslim leaders do nothing to help women being mistreated and held in captivity in their own countries.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Getting the balance right after the 2020 Summit

    • Frank Brennan
    • 26 May 2008
    1 Comment

    The text is from Professor Frank Brennan's 2008 Institute of Justice Studies Oration from 22 May 2008.  

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Time running out for Khmer Rouge justice

    • Sebastian Strangio
    • 09 April 2008

    After nearly three decades of legal impunity, justice is finally catching up with the surviving Khmer Rouge leadership. But there's every chance the defendants will be dead before the courts have a chance to bring them to trial.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    2020 delegates an unpredictable but dynamic mix

    • John Warhurst
    • 07 April 2008
    2 Comments

    The productivity of the 2020 Summit will come from interplay within groups, not individual performance. It will be a big job to prevent it becoming the pushiest and the loudest rather than the best and the brightest.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Time for due process in East Timor assistance

    • Frank Brennan
    • 12 December 2007

    Eighteen months on from the 2006 unrest, Australian and New Zealand troops are still patrolling the streets of Dili. There has been no imperative for them to exchange berets and operate under UN auspices as occurred with the original INTERFET engagement.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Lawyers' role in a democracy

    • Frank Brennan
    • 29 November 2007

    The power of the State can be exercised capriciously and unaccountably when the “Don’t ask; don’t tell” approach to government is immune from parliamentary, judicial or public scrutiny. It is the task of lawyers to make it more difficult for politicians to take this approach.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review