Search Results: Margaret Dooley

  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    An unlikely pilgrim

    • Michelle Coram
    • 12 December 2007
    9 Comments

    The Camino de Santiago in Spain is over a thousand years old and trodden by tens of thousands of pilgrims each year. But for this pilgrim it was simply a cheap holiday, a sure way to get fit. She wasn't expecting any miracles.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Our own generational change

    • Michael Mullins
    • 14 November 2007

    Handing responsibility to younger people is a factor lurking in the background of the election campaign, as the major parties struggle to convince voters that they're relevant and focused on the future. For Eureka Street, we're looking to encourage a new generation of writers able to bring ethical argument and human values to their treatment of society and culture.

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  • INFORMATION

    A selection of some of the letters regarding Frank Brennan's most recent piece

    • 13 July 2007

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  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    Margaret Dooley Award 2007

    • Eureka Street Staff
    • 05 July 2007
    6 Comments

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  • CONTRIBUTORS

    Sarah Kanowski

    • Sarah Kanowski
    • 17 May 2007

    Sarah Kanowski is a writer, and a producer and broadcaster with ABC Radio National. She held a Commonwealth Scholarship at Oxford University between 2000 and 2002, and won the inaugural Margaret Dooley Young Writers' Award in 2005  

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  • CONTRIBUTORS

    Kirsty Sangster

    • Kirsty Sangster
    • 17 May 2007

    Kirsty Sangster is a Melbourne poet whose first collection, Midden Places, will be published in 2006 by Black Pepper Press. She submitted two articles to win equal second and highly commended in the inaugural Margaret Dooley Young Writers’ Award.

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  • CONTRIBUTORS

    Meaghan Paul

    • Meaghan Paul
    • 17 May 2007

    Meaghan Paul is chaplain at Methodist Ladies’ College, Melbourne. She submitted two articles to win equal second and highly commended in the inaugural Margaret Dooley Young Writers’ Award.

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  • CONTRIBUTORS

    Jonathan Hill

    • Jonathan Hill
    • 17 May 2007

    Jonathan is a qualified teacher who was based in Ngukurr late last year, and Minyerri for the first two terms of this year. He has also worked as a boarding school supervisor in Darwin, with teenage boys from remote communities. In Sydney, he has worked with urban Aboriginies, facilitating an after school activities program at The Block in Redfern. He was last year's winner of Eureka Street's Margaret Dooley Award for Young Writers.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Respect for human rights requires debt cancellation

    • Angelica Hannan
    • 27 February 2007
    1 Comment

    To address the problem of Third World debt, citizens of developed countries need to place the satisfaction of human needs at the heart of government policy. A history of poor governance, greed, and cultural imperialism are at the core of the Global North’s exploitation of the South.

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  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    What it feels like to have to run

    • Christine Kearney
    • 22 January 2007
    2 Comments

    Ten months after the renewed violence and lawlessness in East Timor, nobody is holding their breath for a simple resolution. It seems the dirty politicking will continue until a new order order has been established to properly replace the vacuum left when the state imploded in 1999. The first of two runner up essays in Eureka Street's Margaret Dooley Young Writers Award 2006.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Our dysfunctional relationship with the earth

    • Michael Mullins
    • 23 December 2006
    1 Comment

    Reports about the death of US technology journalist James Kim in the snowdrifts of the Oregon wilderness suggest his fatal mistake was that he had put his faith in electronic mapping.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Arnhem Land vision for sanity in the city

    • Jonathan Hill
    • 23 December 2006
    10 Comments

    After a visit to Ngukurr in Arnhem Land, a return home to Sydney and the horrifying reality of a culture that measures progress by the extent to which humans can destroy the land.

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