Search Results: Wikipedia

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Life in the Ramadan fasting lane

    • Pat Walsh
    • 04 September 2012
    2 Comments

    The fasting rule is interpreted flexibly. You are free not to fast if you have to travel, are pregnant, old, little, sick, or basically have a good excuse. Ironically, Ramadan can also involve an enormous amount of cooking, late night and pre-dawn binges. Households buy up. Restaurants offer discounts. One hotel lobby was decked out like Mecca.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Hail to the climate geeks

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 21 August 2012
    27 Comments

    The word geek has changed from a term of derision to one of smiling respect and even a badge of honour. The members of the Climate Commission would no doubt be happy to be called geeks. Unfortunately there is far too little 'geek' representation in the halls of power.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Assange tests British diplomatic principle

    • Tony Kevin
    • 19 August 2012
    21 Comments

    Julian Assange sits securely in the Embassy of Ecuador in London, as Cardinal József Mindszenty did for years inside the US Embassy in Communist-ruled Hungary. This is a benefit of the Vienna Convention. If Britain violated this principle by storming or cutting off utilities to the Embassy, the diplomatic protection of its officials and their families around the world would be weakened immediately.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aboriginal voices silence Vietnamese war stories

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 08 August 2012
    2 Comments

    The anti-American rhetoric is direct and effective, the phrase AMERICAN WAR OF AGGRESSION a recurring, pulsating slur. Yet who would deny it, faced with this photographic account of Vietnamese suffering? There are at least two versions of any war, and this is theirs. But there are others.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    Euthanasing the disabled

    • Moira Byrne Garton
    • 28 June 2012
    6 Comments

    Earlier this month a Canadian Supreme Court effectively legalised physician-assisted euthanasia. While there is a general perception that those opposed to euthanasia do so on religious grounds, many people with disabilities oppose euthanasia because they believe it is bad policy that denies their right to live. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Xanana on the wall

    • Tessa McMahon
    • 25 June 2012
    9 Comments

    The bed on which I lie is scientifically sprung, approved by chiropractors ... and blessed from on high by Klimt ... Made by a woman Timor-thin, cross-legged on concrete.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    When humanity came second to research

    • Lyn Bender
    • 07 May 2012
    9 Comments

    The experimenters' intent was to observe the capacity of first year students to inflict pain by electrically shocking others. Many of the subjects were traumatised as though they had in fact committed acts of torture. Paradoxically the latest revelations may mean the researchers themselves need counselling.

    READ MORE
  • EDUCATION

    No easy cure for 'cost disease' in Australian schools

    • Dean Ashenden
    • 06 May 2012
    13 Comments

    The Productivity Commission Schools Workforce report released on Friday does contain evidence of the dire state of productivity in Australian schools, but it is largely neutered. It's as if the Commission was anxious to avoid stating too plainly a disease for which it can suggest only palliatives.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Pope's equivocal view of social justice

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 03 May 2012
    27 Comments

    In his reflections on society and aspects of human life, Pope Benedict privileges charity. If any planning or struggle for a just society is to be effective it will depend on people's good will and generosity in the implementation. The Pope also says 'yes' to social justice. But his 'yes' is normally a 'yes, but ...'.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Imagining nationalism through Anzac suffering

    • Benedict Coleridge
    • 22 April 2012
    10 Comments

    Political theorist Isaiah Berlin argued that nationalism manifests most strongly in communities that have suffered some wound. In a period of unparalleled wealth, in which most Australians are far removed from war, Anzac Day is a way of instructing ourselves about the place of suffering in Australia's history.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Greens moral vision safe in Milne's hands

    • Tony Kevin
    • 18 April 2012
    28 Comments

    Retiring Greens leader Bob Brown is not the avuncular teddy-bear politician some paint him as. He and new leader Christine Milne share the same steel and political acumen. The next promising generation of Greens leaders will be nurtured and grow under Milne's leadership. And there are many of them.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    The best and worst of international aid

    • Duncan MacLaren
    • 16 April 2012
    4 Comments

    Rumour has it the Government's projected aid budget increases will be cut to ensure a surplus. Some aid doesn't work: I was horrified as a young aid worker in the '80s being told that an open sewer in an Addis Ababa slum was a World Bank project. But aid does work if it is underpinned by a few key principles.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review