Search Results: privacy

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Voting with instinct

    • Tony Smith
    • 31 October 2007
    1 Comment

    Some political professionals would like to see the state behave just like the market, operating as a heartless machine for maximising outcomes. However, truly rational electors realise that if the system is to be imbued with compassion and humanity, the heart must play a role no less important than the head.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    'Don't be evil' a struggle for Google

    • James Massola
    • 05 September 2007
    5 Comments

    Channel 7's purchase of AFL players' medical records has highlighted privacy concerns. Most users of Google are not aware of the extent to which it compromises their privacy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Further challenge to historical record on Aboriginal massacres

    • Tony Smith
    • 11 July 2007
    2 Comments

    A 19th century dispute over rights to whale on Victoria’s western coast saw a massacre of local Aboriginal people. The image of uniformed, white officers appearing in Aboriginal communities, supposedly to restore order and protect children, gives eerie timeliness to an uncompromising new account by Bruce Pascoe.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Science journalism battles stereotypes

    • Tim Thwaites
    • 18 May 2007
    1 Comment

    Science coverage in the media is dominated by boffins and nerds in lab coats . It loses out to “real” stories of politics and economics in the serious broadsheets, magazines and current affairs programs, and to crime and celebrities in the tabloids and to infotainment on TV.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Passing go

    • Anthony Ham
    • 18 May 2007

    Migration hurdles

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Respect for human rights requires debt cancellation

    • Angelica Hannan
    • 27 February 2007
    1 Comment

    To address the problem of Third World debt, citizens of developed countries need to place the satisfaction of human needs at the heart of government policy. A history of poor governance, greed, and cultural imperialism are at the core of the Global North’s exploitation of the South.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Biotech revolution promises to alter human nature

    • Ursula Stephens
    • 24 December 2006

    The most significant threat posed by contemporary biotechnology is the possibility that it will alter human nature—and thereby move us into what Fukuyama calls a "post human" stage of history. From 14 November 2006.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Biotech revolution promises to alter human nature

    • Ursula Stephens
    • 13 November 2006
    4 Comments

    The most significant threat posed by contemporary biotechnology is the possibility that it will alter human nature—and thereby move us into what Fukuyama calls a "post human" stage of history.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The bloke with a book at the bar

    • Paul Daffey
    • 30 October 2006

    Phil is always at the end of the bar with his head in a book or, occasionally, a newspaper. He never tires of reading in company, with a either a vodka and Coke or a Cascade Light just off the page.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Virtual voyeurism

    • Margaret Cassidy
    • 10 July 2006

    Webcams allow us to see ordinary life as it is being lived around the world. A myriad of sites takes us to tourist sites, places of worship, and even to the Antarctic.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A murder in the family

    • Trent O'Bryan
    • 10 July 2006
    1 Comment

    Karen Kissane’s book on the murder of Julie Ramage by her husband makes us ask ourselves whether the private attitudes that allowed men to claim provocation as a defence for killing their partners have really changed.  Do they also need to be overhauled? 

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