Search Results: Christos Tsiolkas

  • AUSTRALIA

    Cashless Cards and other salvos in the war on the poor

    • Michele Madigan
    • 06 June 2017
    11 Comments

    In 1978 Kaurna/Narungga woman, Georgina Williams, said to me that Aboriginal people tend to be first on the receiving end of governmental oppressive practices and, when that works, the practices are extended to other poor Australians. Thirty-nine years later, almost every day brings new evidence of a relentless campaign against the poor, of which Cashless Cards are but one particularly vindictive example.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Helen Garner's 'Best Essays' triumph

    • Barry Gittins and Jen Vuk
    • 13 February 2015

    The Best Australian Essays 2014 finely illustrates the unnervingly unclear line between essay and short story, but no-one plays with form quite like the indomitable Helen Garner. She offers such a brooding, aching ode to her mother. Proof again that good writing is an inexorable, spiritual exercise that seers itself into the reader's memory. How does she do it?

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Best of 2013: Ja'mie's disability

    • Michael Mullins
    • 09 January 2014

    TV viewers are alarmed that they can so easily identify with Ja'mie King, Chris Lilley's studiously unlikeable comic creation in ABC1's Ja'mie: Private School Girl. In a previous incarnation, Ja'mie was sponsoring underprivileged Third World children about whom she knew little and cared less. People like Ja'mie have a pathological disability to feel the needs of others.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Ja'mie's disability

    • Michael Mullins
    • 28 October 2013
    18 Comments

    TV viewers are alarmed that they can so easily identify with Ja'mie King, Chris Lilley's studiously unlikeable comic creation in ABC1's Ja'mie: Private School Girl. In a previous incarnation, Ja'mie was sponsoring underprivileged Third World children about whom she knew little and cared less. People like Ja'mie have a pathological disability to feel the needs of others.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Stories about people who want to do better

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 20 December 2012
    3 Comments

    One man suffers the shame of sex addiction. For another, a quadriplegic, sex is a matter of dignity. Two couples meet for a civilised discussion about their children's behaviour, but civility collapses. An antihero embraces violence as a solution to exploitative American media. Eureka Street counts down its essential films of 2012.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Polite parents of violent children

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 01 March 2012

    As with Christos Tsiolkas' The Slap, an act of violence involving children acts as a catalyst to exacerbate the adult characters' prejudices, insecurities and resentments. Aided by alcohol, civility is gradually stripped away as a polite gathering degenerates into bullying and abuse.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Family violence and The Slap

    • Moira Rayner
    • 25 November 2011
    20 Comments

    As anyone who has read or watched The Slap would know, violence is intimately connected with power, ego, frustration and sex. The most sympathetic characters are prepared to take on an adult world of subtlety and complication, on honest terms. So let it be with violence in our homes.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Australia's child abuse parable

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 27 October 2011
    4 Comments

    At its heart is an act of violence against a child. But on the whole The Slap stands as an epic parable of middle class Australia. The tagline 'Whose side are you on?' is a furphy: it is impossible to wholly sympathise with any character. 

    READ MORE
  • EUREKA STREET TV

    Student journalism's gift to Eureka Street

    • Peter Kirkwood
    • 07 October 2011
    2 Comments

    READ MORE
  • EUREKA STREET TV

    Student journalism's gift to Eureka Street

    • Peter Kirkwood
    • 07 October 2011

    In the Australian media landscape, Eureka Street is countercultural, giving space to younger writers such as Ellena Savage. She edited Melbourne University's student newspaper Farrago in 2010, following a range of luminaries including Geoffrey Blainey, Morag Fraser, Lindsay Tanner, Kate Legge, Christos Tsiolkas and Nam Le.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Radio National slaps intellectual rigour

    • Michael Mullins
    • 26 September 2011
    12 Comments

    Author of The Slap Christos Tsiolkas wrote to the ABC Board last Monday to plead the case for maintaining a stand-alone books program on Radio National. 'Stand-alone' refers to the specialisation that allows for the intellectual rigour that has made the station exceptional.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Historical novels

    • Delia Falconer
    • 06 July 2006

    Are we writing too many of them? Is there a crisis of relevance in Austlit? No, argues Delia Falconer.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review