Search Results: Funny Cow

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Comedy and trauma in Nanette and Funny Cow

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 31 July 2018
    1 Comment

    Hannah Gadsby's Nanette critiques comedy as an imperfect tool for processing and transcending trauma. Funny Cow, about a woman comedian in 1970s northern England, attempts something similar. Both say something about the intersection of comedy and trauma and what it reveals about how we relate to each other as human beings.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Lessons for ALP in UK Labour fightback

    • Jeff Sparrow
    • 08 June 2017
    17 Comments

    When Corbyn invoked the many against the few, he did so while advocating free education, the renationalisation of utilities and a break from the US alliance. By contrast, Blair coined the phrase in a speech where he urged listeners to put behind them 'the bitter political struggles of left and right that have torn our country apart for too many decades. Many of these conflicts have no relevance whatsoever to the modern world - public versus private, bosses versus workers, middle class versus working class.' We all know which version sits closer to Shorten's heart.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A euthanasia parable in the outback

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 August 2015
    3 Comments

    Dismayed by the prognosis that he has only three months to live, Broken Hill cabbie Rex abandons his work, home and mates and sets out for Darwin to seek the help of prominent euthanasia advocate Dr Nicole Farmer (a fictional Dr Philip Nitschke). The story is as much about the journey as the destination, although there are those who would argue that its pat 'choose life' message just feels too easy.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A word with dad

    • Brian Doyle
    • 09 September 2014
    4 Comments

    Somehow, even with all those children, and with the usual brawl and bawl among his sons, and what surely must have been many a snide remark from his daughter, our dad never lost his temper, or even, that we remember, his equanimity. Just as amazing, he never seemed to miss a crime or misdemeanour, but somehow knew of it instantly.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Sex is to pregnancy what racism is to genocide

    • Ellena Savage
    • 06 June 2013
    10 Comments

    This past fortnight, race has been high on the agenda. Can a 13-year-old be racist? Is what Eddie McGuire said racist? Meanwhile, revelations that police officers in one Melbourne suburb had printed and distributed 50 racist stubby holders hinted at a frightening culture of racialised violence. The reality is that racial violence is inextricable from racist language.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Alone in Obama's America

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 October 2012

    On a television in a grimy bar, Barack Obama waxes lyrical about the unity of the people. In the foreground, a brutal and enigmatic enforcer of the criminal underworld scoffs. America is not a community, he counters — it's a business. 'I'm living in America, and in America, you're on your own.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    God understands more

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe
    • 18 January 2011
    1 Comment

    It all takes place because of some geological fault. I think God understands more things than he is given credit for.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Confession of a football criminal

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 28 April 2010
    7 Comments

    The case was not reported in the local paper, much to our disappointment, so we never had the distinction of being described as 'local youths'. In our pre-teen innocence, we were convinced our parents would appeal, all the way to the High Court if necessary. They had more sense.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Humanity trumps moralism in WYD film festival

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 July 2008
    1 Comment

    The Iñigo Film Festival features films that reflect spiritual experience or the link between faith and justice. The Judas Pane plays upon traditional understandings of the gospels and critiques the subjective depiction of religious icons.

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  • RELIGION

    Playful irreverence in the Town Common

    • Richard Treloar
    • 18 May 2007
    2 Comments

    Was Triple J's Jesus impersonation contest in Melbourne's Federation Square on the day before Good Friday merely a revival of the 'carnivalesque' tradition of playful irreverence that is linked with a destruction and uncrowning related to birth and renewal.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Close encounters

    • Kerrie O’Brien
    • 10 July 2006

    Kerrie O’Brien contacts some entertaining ghosts in Blithe Spirit.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Myth-take no mistake

    • Juliette Hughes
    • 24 June 2006

    Juliette Hughes reviews Terry Pratchett’s The Wee Free Men and Eoin Colfer’s Artemis Fowl: The Eternity Code.

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