Search Results: Galore

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A world of majesty and cruelty

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 11 August 2017
    14 Comments

    We have just taken off from Dubai for St Petersburg. My son is marvelling at the immensity of Dubai’s airport—now officially the busiest in the world. We have stood on a bus—stifling, cramped—and boarded our air-conditioned connecting flight with a deep sense of relief. We have watched the planes lining up behind ours on the shimmering tarmac, and have noted the outside temperature flashing on the screen: 44 degrees Celsius. Thank God we’re getting out of here. 

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    People's stories animate the landscapes in which we travel

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 29 March 2017
    6 Comments

    In the past two weeks I've met a man who crossed the Andes on foot, horse, bicycle, car and even rollerblades. I've trekked with a mountain guide to a rocky outcrop upon which he was due to marry his fiancé the following weekend, before abseiling down it with her. I've stood in a forest with a woman who came here in the hope of finding the perfect plot of land. Landscapes have a profound effect on the traveller, but it's their inhabitants who evoke for us the soul of a place far more effectively.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    How class shapes art in 21st century Australia

    • Ellena Savage
    • 09 December 2016
    4 Comments

    To be in the running for a scholarship, a student must have had their abilities or potential acknowledged and rewarded within an ideological education system. Where the money comes from - and whom it is given to - informs what kinds of artwork thrives. As Didier Eribon says, 'art, culture and education are part of the mechanisms of differentiation between social classes'. And the institutional frameworks underpinning the production of artwork can lead to pernicious political outcomes.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Ethical reflections on seeking sustainable development for India

    • Frank Brennan
    • 28 November 2016

    'No matter what the economic, political and legal problems confronted by modern day India, our response can be improved by an application of the key principles and norms developed in the international law of trade and human rights, helping to enunciate the realm of law, regulation and political accountability, enhancing public scrutiny providing the right environment for doing business.' Frank Brennan presents the 25th JRD Tata Oration, Xavier School of Management, Jamshedpur, India, 26 November 2016.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    No longer thumped

    • Isabella Fels
    • 22 July 2014
    2 Comments

    First kiss was kind of crass. Like a big bite on the bottom. Not bliss. Not my idea of a wish. I could have crossed it off the list ... You only get one life. For some women it's all about being a wife. I stay away from the conventions of life.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Youths burned by the flames of self interest

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 26 June 2014

    When it comes to symbols of destruction and renewal, few are more potent than bushfires. That is particularly true in the Australian context. Galore's poignant coming-of-age story unfolds in the weeks prior to the 2003 Canberra bushfires. It is, in part, a rumination on adolescent self-centredness: its inevitability and inadequacy as a shield protecting the vulnerable, budding self from the flames of experience.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Rudd resurrection no miracle cure for Labor

    • John Warhurst
    • 19 September 2011
    9 Comments

    If Rudd was re-installed as leader, Howard's Lazarus impersonation and Menzies' return to office in 1949 would have been outdone by the most remarkable twist ever in Australian politics. Only insiders know whether it might happen. Only voters know whether it might work.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Curry muncher

    • Roanna Gonsalves
    • 23 June 2009
    36 Comments

    Vincent and I were both international students from Bombay. He had lived here for a year while I had only arrived three months ago. We worked in the same Indian restaurant. The night of his attack, Vincent sounded upbeat on the train.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Murder sequel has charm galore

    • Tony Smith
    • 18 July 2008

    Marion Halligan has a fine appreciation of the literary process linking author and reader. In Murder on the Apricot Coast she teases with a critique of sequels and argues that only the reader's imagination can extend the lives of literary characters.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The joker in the pack—top ten limericks

    • Judges Philip Harvey, James Massola and Andrew Hamilton
    • 23 December 2006
    8 Comments

    In a cage in Guantanamo bay / David Hicks sees his life slip away... The top ten entries in Eureka Street's limerick competition.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A planet of slums

    • Gary Pearce
    • 10 July 2006

    Mike Davis' new book belongs to a long tradition of studies of the urban poor – among them, Friedrich Engels’s examination of Victorian Manchester in The Condition of the Working Class in England. Davis updates this genre for a period of globalisation.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Virtual voyeurism

    • Margaret Cassidy
    • 10 July 2006

    Webcams allow us to see ordinary life as it is being lived around the world. A myriad of sites takes us to tourist sites, places of worship, and even to the Antarctic.

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