Search Results: Hugo Weaving

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Drug mule's poo strike stymies bad cops

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 11 December 2014

    During an end-of-season trip to Bangkok, impressionable country footy dork Ray is badgered by one of his teammates into turning drug mule. He is picked up in Melbourne, where a couple of nasty cops detain him under supervision for seven days, waiting for him to pass the heroin-filled balloons he ingested. Ray is beset on all sides by systemic corruption, which makes his refusal to poo — fuelled not by greed but by a kind of everyman nobility — seem truly heroic.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hugo Weaving's grief and healing

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 08 May 2014

    Weaving's latest character is inspired by a real-life minimum-security prison officer whose daughter had died. This man helped develop a program for rehabilitating injured raptors, that would be overseen by prisoners as part of their own rehabilitation. 'The program encapsulated the positive side,' says Weaving, 'of someone trying to deal with their own grief, and healing himself by setting up a kind of living memorial to his daughter.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Human stories from Tim Winton's Australia

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 12 September 2013
    3 Comments

    A boy plays a treacherous prank on his brother while visiting the beach. A domestic violence victim finds comfort in a bizarre distortion of Christian faith. A man sees a news report and follows his memories back to the day of a childhood tragedy. A woman, grieving for a broken marriage, paws through her husband's box of memories. The filmmakers put their stamp on each story while paying due reverance to Winton's sublime prose.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    No sympathy for abusive clergy

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 09 June 2011
    15 Comments

    The Christian Brothers have made efforts to atone for cases of child abuse that occurred in their institutions. That Oranges and Sunshine condemns them universally is due less to malice than to the fact that the filmmaker's sympathies sit squarely with the victims.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hook turns on weighty subtext

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 25 September 2008

    The characters provide a microcosm of Australia as a fledgling federation. Most poignant is the place of the film's sole Aboriginal character, a gifted pugilist who is ultimately subservient to the purposes of the white characters.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Film reviews

    • Siobhan Jackson, Gil Maclean
    • 14 May 2006

    Reviews  of  the  films  Inside  Man,  V  for  Vendetta,  Capote,  and  The  March  of  the  Penguins.

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