Search Results: United Patriots Front

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • MEDIA

    Media complicit in normalising fascism

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 12 August 2018
    6 Comments

    For too long, the media has been complicit in maintaining the conditions which allow the likes of Cottrell and Hanson to become 'figures'. They fuel history wars, demonise migrants, target Aboriginal activists, objectify and ridicule women while ensuring at the end of the day, the Murdochs and Packers of the world still have hefty pay cheques.

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  • RELIGION

    The past, present and future of the Easter Rising 1916

    • Frank Brennan
    • 01 May 2016
    2 Comments

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Naming and renaming uni's racist monuments

    • Jeff Sparrow
    • 01 December 2015
    7 Comments

    For many years, historian Gary Foley has drawn attention to the racist past inscribed throughout the infrastructure of Melbourne University. Now, some staff and students are campaigning to rename facilities linked to particularly egregious individuals, such as the Richard Berry building, named after a leading eugenicist who stole the corpses of Indigenous people for research designed to prove the racial superiority of whites. While some accuse the campaigners of politically correct censorship, in fact the past has already been censored, and the campaigners are dragging it back into the light.

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  • MEDIA

    A fascist by any other name

    • Jeff Sparrow
    • 16 November 2015
    15 Comments

    In journalism, 'he said, she said' often functions as an evasion. Reporters' loyalty should be to accuracy, which isn't about compromise between extremes. When denialists and climate scientists take diametrically opposed stances, the truth doesn't lie somewhere in the middle. Sometimes, one side's right and the other's just wrong. The same can be said of reporting about the rightwing United Patriots Front. While they deny being fascists, that's what they are, and that's what we should call them.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    International Criminal Court's African bias

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 12 July 2012
    3 Comments

    On Tuesday, the International Criminal Court sentenced Congolese warlord Thomas Lubanga Dyilo for his use of child soldiers. It is the first sentence handed down by an institution regarded by many as a political front. As one Congolese official noted, 'You'll never see an American pass before the ICC. All of the accused are Africans.'

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  • RELIGION

    Rethinking indigeneity in the age of globalisation

    • Frank Brennan
    • 01 November 2010
    3 Comments

    There is an emerging Aboriginal middle class. The contested questions in those communities relate to the expensive delivery of services including health, housing and education. The contested issue in the urban community is over self-identification as Aboriginal by persons of mixed descent.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Exposure: a fable in three parts

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 19 March 2009
    1 Comment

    Be it fact or fiction, there is something humanising in the notion of young Pauline Hanson exposing her not-so-innocence to her then boyfriend's camera.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Remembering a hanging

    • Peter Norden
    • 27 February 2007
    33 Comments

    Forty years ago Ronald Ryan had a noose put around his neck by the prison hangman. With the authority of the Victorian State Government, its then Premier, Henry Bolte, and the Victorian Supreme Court he was killed. Ryan was the last man hanged in Australia, and many believe he will always retain that infamous privilege.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Seoul-centring Korea

    • Gavan McCormack
    • 04 July 2006

    Encouraging the North–South relationship offers the best hope for North Korea and the world

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Truth, politics and the Fourth Estate

    • Morag Fraser
    • 14 May 2006

    The following essays by Morag Fraser and John Schumann are edited addresses from the Jesuit Lenten Seminar Series held in February–March 2005.

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