Search Results: Where the Streets Have No Name

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • ECONOMICS

    Women's economic security plan is no safety net

    • Eliza Berlage
    • 22 November 2018

    The government finally released its women's economic security statement. The package is built around three pillars — workforce participation, earning potential, and economic independence — totalling $109 million dollars over four years. It is a drop in the ocean compared to what is needed to address the crisis of gender violence and substantial inequality.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Extinction Rebellion taking bold action

    • Kate Galloway
    • 21 November 2018
    4 Comments

    The movement is not secretive: it declares itself publicly, and openly. It announced in advance to police and emergency services: 'We are bold. We will not hide. We are all in open rebellion.'     

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  • RELIGION

    Seeking a plenary council fit for purpose

    • Frank Brennan
    • 14 November 2018
    41 Comments

    What we need is a listening and inclusive Church — a plenary council at which the clergy and the laity have a proper place at the table, at which the voices of the ‘rusted-on’ and the ‘cheesed-off’ Catholics are heard and at which the bishops are respectfully listening as much as speaking. 

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Opera House ads are not 'food for everyone'

    • Francine Crimmins
    • 12 October 2018
    5 Comments

    There are a few ways an individual can interact with a public space. The first is to sit in or walk through it while crunching an apple. The second is to inhabit it, grow an apple tree and share it with others. The third is to grow the tree, pick the apples behind your neighbours' backs and sell them to Woolworths for a profit.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Bali nightmare on Mick Shann Terrace

    • Bee Spencer
    • 26 September 2018
    8 Comments

    Day by day, home owners in this Canberra street scout out potential wealth and children walk to school, unaware of who they've attached their names to. Mick Shann wasn't just any public official and his legacy lives on in other places. In scars carved into the backs of miraculous survivors. In empty coffins and overflowing graves.

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  • RELIGION

    A help to the world: the 1937 Plenary Council

    • Nick Brodie
    • 11 September 2018
    4 Comments

    Catholics gathered in the wake of a time of great hardship, and in Christ's name sought the common good. Aware of continuity with the Apostles, the bishops recognised that the church changed through history. It was both progressive and conservative in parts, but not regressive.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Affirmative consent is good for everyone

    • Tim Hutton
    • 31 August 2018
    7 Comments

    A classic argument of those opposed to active consent is that it paints all men as predators. On the contrary, active consent should actually provide greater peace of mind to men than the current mainstream approach. When in doubt, ask. If the response is not unambiguous and affirmative, then do not proceed.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    A journey with urban refugees in Bangkok

    • Michael Kelly
    • 27 August 2018
    3 Comments

    Some days I feel like a people trafficker, though I'm not making a zack out of the trafficking. Other days I see myself as a latter-day Oskar Schindler. But mostly I just feel trapped along with the 1000 refugees and asylum seekers I'm doing my not-very-successful best to get the hell out of an open prison called Bangkok.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A night at the theatre

    • Ardakh Nurgaz
    • 22 August 2018

    An actor is holding a skull in his hand. Life has nothing to say. Someone is waiting to disembark from a bus. The stage is holding its breath.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Among the ghosts of Chernobyl

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 15 August 2018
    5 Comments

    The earthworms and bees were the first to know, wrote Nobel laureate and Belarusian native Svetlana Alexievich. The bees stayed in their hives; the worms buried themselves so deep that fishermen digging for bait on the banks of the Pripyat River were perplexed that they couldn't find any. The humans were slower to learn.

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  • MEDIA

    Free expression is a workplace issue too

    • Osmond Chiu
    • 13 August 2018
    5 Comments

    Whether Carr or Greer participates at Brisbane Writers Festival has no real impact on their ability to speak out and be heard. The real threat to freedom of expression for most people comes not from programming decisions at literary festivals but rather to the public through their employers.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Walking home alone

    • Neve Mahoney
    • 08 August 2018
    5 Comments

    It's 11.30 on a weeknight. I'm on the train, coming home from catching up with my friends. I'm on the phone with one of them as I move to the doors. 'Yeah, I'm right to walk home,' I tell my worried friend. 'The train's pulling up the station now.' I said that too loudly. I glance behind me and there are two men standing there.

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