Search Results: empathy

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  • AUSTRALIA

    How we decide if asylum seekers lie

    • Douglas McDonald-Norman
    • 13 September 2018
    6 Comments

    In the five years I worked in refugee law, some of the most complicated challenges I encountered were questions regarding the 'truthfulness' or 'credibility' of an asylum seeker's claims. These subjective findings of credibility can make the difference between a person being granted asylum or being turned away.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why powerful people behave badly

    • Conor Wynn
    • 05 July 2018
    12 Comments

    Pinning all the blame for poor behaviour on deliberate individual choice is a fundamental attribution error. We need to rise above the salacious gossip and the spectacle of corporate beheadings to understand what drives behaviour in powerful people, take a more reasoned approach and achieve sustainable change.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Portrait of a killer at school

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 26 June 2018

    My Friend Dahmer, based on the memoir by John Backderf about his teenage friendship with the soon-to-be killer, is a complex character study of which Dahmer's troubled home life, repressed homosexuality, abuse of alcohol, and experiences of bullying and social alienation are motley features rather than defining characteristics.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Fractured family in the house of grief

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 June 2018
    1 Comment

    The pressure starts to get to Annie when she begins to suspect her mother is haunting her. This exacerbates pre-existing tensions; her husband is caring in a mildly condescending way, but is more concerned with the wellbeing of their children. Is the haunting real, then, or just a symptom of Annie's reluctance to let go?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Our economy is failing families

    • Erin Riley
    • 09 April 2018
    11 Comments

    As I drop my daughter at daycare at 6:30am, to be looked after by someone else who I then have to pay, to go to work to earn enough money to pay our rent and daycare, I am struck by how much our system is failing families. It was a failure of my own empathy that I only came to understand this after I experienced it personally.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Locked out of our mother tongues

    • Sheila Ngoc Pham
    • 26 March 2018
    7 Comments

    On my first day of primary school, I understood very little English and spoke even less. My parents seemed to feel little anxiety and assumed I'd just figure it out at school. Turns out they weren't wrong. However, what they didn't anticipate is what would happen to my Vietnamese.

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  • EDUCATION

    Best of 2017: Hanson's autism remark misses value of diversity

    • Madeleine Hamilton
    • 10 January 2018
    2 Comments

    The mood was subdued at the gates of our small Catholic primary school at 3:30pm on Wednesday. Ten per cent of our school's students have an autism diagnosis, and for their parents who had read Pauline Hanson's comments to the Senate that afternoon, those familiar feelings had been activated yet again.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    21st century protest from Cairo to Don Dale

    • Marta Skrabacz
    • 03 December 2017
    4 Comments

    There’s no reason to judge the success of a protest by whether it achieved its desired outcome: the adage ‘it’s a marathon, not a sprint’ rings true. Effective change is a matter of increment; it has to happen at every strata of society. Protests bear the brunt of proving success, when the burden for change actually exists with the system they’re opposing.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    They're not lone wolves, they're canaries

    • Rachel Woodlock
    • 13 November 2017
    7 Comments

    These lone-wolf terrorists are more like miners' canaries. Whether it is a paranoid loner, an enraged ideologue, a jihadist or a white supremacist, they are screaming out at the top of their lungs that something is terribly wrong.

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  • MEDIA

    My #MeToo dilemma

    • Kate Moriarty
    • 25 October 2017
    5 Comments

    In real life, 'me too' happens in whispered conversations between close friends. I carry these women's secrets inside me like dark polished stones. I marvel that such strong, capable, ordinary people, from loving and functional families, could be survivors of child sexual abuse. None of them has written 'me too' on their status. I checked.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    How to be civil in an uncivil world

    • Barry Gittins
    • 12 October 2017
    3 Comments

    In 2017, we have had one of the most uncivil years in memory, with assaults against politicians, institutions, entire demographics. What can we learn from antiquity? The obvious lesson from Rome's post-Caesarian civil wars is that internecine conflict is inevitably punctuated by further conflict and wrestling for power.

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  • MEDIA

    Why having a female Dr Who matters

    • Neve Mahoney
    • 26 July 2017
    12 Comments

    It was recently announced that the thirteenth iteration of the main character in Doctor Who will be played by Jodie Whittaker. A woman. In 2017, the casting of a white woman in a major TV role is hardly revolutionary, except that the role is the Doctor, a regenerative alien who can take on the appearance of anyone, but has for 12 iterations tended towards the persona of a quirky British white man.

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