Search Results: managerialism

If there are more than 100 matches, only the first 100 are displayed here.

  • EDUCATION

    Academics tangle with managerial oppressors

    • David James
    • 13 June 2018
    15 Comments

    The imposition of 'managerialism' or 'marketisation' on universities is disastrous. So why are academics so passive when their working lives are being immiserated by the imposition of ideas, mostly derived from business or economics, that are either patently false or poor?

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Hansonism is normal and everything is not fine

    • Tim Robertson
    • 16 February 2017
    10 Comments

    This is not the beginning of the normalisation of Hanson and One Nation: it's the end. In a piece for The Monthly, Dominic Kelly highlighted how large swaths of the rightwing commentariat have embraced the 'more mature', 'disciplined' and 'principled' Hanson 2.0. Despite this rhetoric, for the Right, appeasing One Nation has always been a balancing act. They're guided by one question: How much racism is permissible before it has to be condemned?

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    The emptiness of reform rhetoric in Australian politics

    • Jeff Sparrow
    • 07 September 2015
    4 Comments

    The recent National Reform Summit was lauded as an attempt to 'rediscover the art of reform that in the past generation helped to drive high living standards and made Australia the envy among smart nations'. Yet the urgency with which Australian pundits demand 'reform' corresponds with a peculiar opacity about what the term actually means, with its past association with the socialist movement but more recent appropriation as a neoliberal mantra. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    All deaths great and small

    • Brian Matthews
    • 25 June 2015
    1 Comment

    Many deaths of course are not small deaths. They evoke distinction, achievement, leadership, innovation, creativity or, in some cases notoriety, quixoticism or eccentricity. Yet placing some names above many, some in a class of their own, others in a ruck of the scarcely memorable, one indispensable criterion unites all the characters and places them beyond our imaginative, intellectual or descriptive reach: they are dead.

    READ MORE
  • MEDIA

    Caucusing cardinals trump greedy media

    • Ray Cassin
    • 14 March 2013
    10 Comments

    The media abhor a vacuum, and thus we got to hear about, among other things, the cabal of anonymous gay clerics who are allegedly at the heart of the Vatileaks and banking scandals. UFOs and monsters from space didn't appear in these stories, but if the Church had endured another week of sede vacante they probably would have.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Ratzinger and Rowan Williams side by side

    • Andrew McGowan
    • 13 February 2013
    21 Comments

    Now that Williams has returned to academic life and Ratzinger has resigned, it is tempting to commit both their reigns to the category of failure, and debate mostly the nobility or otherwise of their inability to bend lurching structures or less gifted minds to their own wills. This would not, however, be the whole picture in either case.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    NSW Labor's diseased ethics

    • Tony Smith
    • 05 February 2013
    11 Comments

    The Labor Party's ethical problems are deep seated. Once it adopted pragmatism as its first principle, policy debates lost meaning. The ideological vacuum was filled by enslavement to poll driven politics and media images. The Left struggled to retain its influence and Labor's heart vanished. We should expect much more from our politicians.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Patients lost at the health care checkout

    • Frank Bowden
    • 28 May 2009
    16 Comments

    To be a patient is to place yourself in the hands of another, to give them your trust and expect it to be honoured. If you call sick people 'clients' or 'customers' you risk turning healing into a commodity to be purchased — or rationed.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The politicisation of defence

    • Michael McKernan
    • 30 March 2009
    3 Comments

    With typical irreverence we have taken some glee in the conflict between politicians and the military. Indeed in our history there has been tension, not to say a distrust, between the military and politicians in Australia.

    READ MORE
  • MEDIA

    Newspaper's golden age

    • Moira Rayner
    • 19 December 2008
    7 Comments

    It is apparently old-fashioned to expect to be primarily informed and engaged by a newspaper, yet that is what Melburnians loved about The Age. As a one-time Age columnist, I came in — and went out — at the turning point for that once venerable organ.

    READ MORE

We've updated our privacy policy.

Click to review