author: Alexandra Coghlan

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Australians shaped by the spirit of place

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 16 January 2009

    Landscape has long been acknowledged as central to Australian colonial history. In contrast to the harsh conditions endured by settlers in Sydney Cove, convicts in Tasmania experienced a veritable Eden. (March 2008)

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Unlikely (big) brothers in arms

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 19 September 2008
    1 Comment

    George Orwell and Evelyn Waugh occupied opposing aesthetic, philosophical and political poles. This conceptually agile book suggests they attained moral — if not spiritual — agreement from fundamentally opposing directions.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Book of the week

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 08 August 2008
    2 Comments

    That a woman was elected to the House of Representatives in 1943 is remarkable. Enid Lyons' drive and endeavour led many to cast her as the political force and her husband Joe Lyons, Australia's tenth Prime Minister, as a figurehead.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Women and madness

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 30 May 2008
    1 Comment

    A change of British statutes in 1815 gave mental illness a new public face that was unequivocally female. Mad, Bad and Sad is a new study that charts the role of madness as a barometer of the values, concerns and morals of its day.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Australians shaped by the spirit of place

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 07 March 2008
    1 Comment

    Landscape has long been acknowledged as central to Australian colonial history. In contrast to the harsh conditions endured by settlers in Sydney Cove, convicts in Tasmania experienced a veritable Eden.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    'Best' essays merit book title's reckless superlative

    • Alexandra Coghlan
    • 13 December 2007

    The recurrence of the ‘big' issues of politics, religion, and sexuality in Best Australian Essays 2007 is predictable enough. But the essays become more interesting when we see particular trends, such as surveillance and the individual's right to privacy, emerge in each.

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