keywords: David Gulpilil

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Grace and quiet rage in David Gulpilil's country

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 24 September 2015

    Gulpilil measures the distance to Ramininging from Darwin by the number of river crossings, and defines its rough edges by the points at which traditional values clash with the imposed or inherited Western trappings. Through him we meet a man who found Christianity while in prison, and who now on Easter Sunday leads an epic reenactment of the Passion through the town's dirt streets. In the degradation of his trial and execution, says Gulpilil, Jesus is neither God nor leader; 'He is black. He is one of us.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In awe of David Gulpilil and his barramundi

    • Peter Gebhardt
    • 10 March 2015
    1 Comment

    I want to eat a piece of Charlie's fish, speared with a 'dangerous weapon' and coal-charred, in his country. Charlie talked to the fish, 'What a good fish'. Covenant. Better than the white man's supermarket stuff.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The devastated face of Aboriginal disempowerment

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 10 July 2014
    2 Comments

    Charlie is disempowered, but not powerless, not yet. He has quit smoking, and ritualistically burns cigarettes he bums from a younger man in the community. He'd prefer to hunt and forage rather than consume the 'whitefella junk' peddled at the local kiosk, though his emaciated body and persistent cough reveal that he has already suffered much from the 'poisons' introduced to Aboriginal culture since the arrival of Europeans.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Remote Aboriginal boy's march against miners

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 June 2013

    Pete lives with his grandfather at an abandoned drive-in cinema outside a remote community. When a mining company threatens to reclaim the land and demolish their home, he sets out across the harsh outback to confront this corporate Goliath. If he is to survive he must draw upon the traditional wisdom his grandfather has passed on to him.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Heartfelt account of life in Mutijulu

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 21 August 2006

    Aided by stirring imagery of the Central Australian outback, Uncle Bob’s melodic vocal tones draw the viewer deeply into his description of the indigenous concept, “Kanyini”—a holistic sense of “connectedness” that encompasses family, belief system, spirituality and relationship with the land.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aboriginal life without the colonial backdrop

    • David Streader
    • 24 July 2006

    Australian cinema has historically depicted Aborigines in relation to modern-day white society.  But the pre-colonial setting of Ten Canoes enables us  better to identify with the characters.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    The Australian wound

    • Mark Byrne
    • 18 May 2006

    Mark Byrne looks at the particular characteristics that make an Australian 'hero', and asks what it is about the interior of this country that moulds the interior of our collective suconscious in such a unique way.  

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hidden lives

    • Kate Cherry
    • 10 May 2006

    Kate Cherry reviews Creating frames: Contemporary Indigenous Theatre by Maryrose Casey.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Stark images in black and white

    • Mark Byrne
    • 25 April 2006

    Australian film-makers have to date been much better at reflecting the often ugly reality of racial relations than at imagining a different future

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