keywords: Thomas Hardy

  • RELIGION

    On love, money and Valentine's Day

    • Barry Gittins
    • 13 February 2019
    6 Comments

    Valentine's Day is built on some fairly shaky historical ground. Rather than honouring a prelate offering bridal trysts, or hoping for a good harvest, I'm inclined to spare a thought for the Greek philosophers and poets who set up shop well before Romulus and Remus; I like to muse over their various efforts to pin down love.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Love and violence in Thomas Hardy’s England

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 16 July 2015
    4 Comments

    English literary journalist Lucasta Miller noted that Hardy's title, Far From the Madding Crowd, with 'madding' taken to mean 'frenzied', is an ironic nod to idyllic perceptions of rural life; Hardy 'disrupts the idyll'. At the heart of the story is Bathsheba, a proud and independent young shepherd who becomes the new proprietor of her late uncle's farm. Her story unfolds against stunning rural landscapes that provide a sublime stage for violence both physical and emotional.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Rape ambiguity in India

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 May 2012
    5 Comments

    It remains unclear whether the encounter was consensual, although the power imbalance in the relationship makes such an encounter ethically dubious even if it was not strictly rape. If it was rape, it is inconceivable that she later becomes her assailant's willing lover.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Best of 2011: Rescuing JFK

    • P. S. Cottier
    • 12 January 2012

    'Kennedy was a cold warrior, but Johnson took it to the next level. He had the same my-balls-are-bigger-than-yours complex as Dubya.' The narrator journeys into the past in order to produce a kinder America. One that may not throw itself into Vietnam with such lust. Published 16 November 2011

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Rescuing JFK

    • P. S. Cottier
    • 17 November 2011

    'Kennedy was a cold warrior, but Johnson took it to the next level. He had the same my-balls-are-bigger-than-yours complex as Dubya.' The narrator journeys into the past in order to produce a kinder America. One that may not throw itself into Vietnam with such lust. 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A sea of opportunity

    • Brian Matthews
    • 09 July 2006

    A week in which Mark Latham becomes the Leader of the Opposition and begins talking about ‘rungs of opportunity’.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Unfinished business

    • Morag Fraser
    • 03 July 2006

    It’s a cliché, and that in itself should make you suspicious. In George Orwell’s centenary year, doubly so.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Language so lovely

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe
    • 18 June 2006

    Chris Wallace-Crabbe on After Shakespeare: An Anthology and The Oxford Book of Aphorisms, both edited by John Gross.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    One more time around

    • Brian Matthews
    • 20 April 2006

    Is it just me, or is it always a bit strange at the start of another year? As if you can feel the earth and the sky and the ambience of things shifting wearily into another gear with a here-we-go-again crunching of cosmic cogs.

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