keywords: Fountain Pen

  • AUSTRALIA

    The Australian wars that Anzac Day neglects

    • Dean Ashenden
    • 22 April 2013
    24 Comments

    Around 20,000 people died in a series of violent conflicts between peoples extending across the entire continent and more than half of our history. We have yet to find a way to remember the loss of those people with anything like the scale and intensity of our other commemorations, such as Anzac Day.

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  • RELIGION

    A funny thing happened on the way to the Vatican

    • Richard Leonard
    • 18 March 2013
    8 Comments

    Francis stood there alone for the cruellest time. This is why members of royal families never appear on balconies alone: you can only wave so often. The Latin Americans went nuts. This guy is now the most famous Argentine ever, jumping Che, Evita and Maradona. Like 'Francis', they specialise in one-name handles too, but with friends like that ... 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Best of 2011: Songs of England at war

    • Philip Harvey
    • 05 January 2012
    1 Comment

    Gallipolli was a disaster and a relatively minor conflict, but it is upon such 'minor' conflicts that Empires are built. These songs go to the heart of a contradictory dilemma: the love of country on the one hand and the ugly extremes of patriotism on the other. Published 23 February 2011

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Skating over Bali bombing remembrance

    • Vince Chadwick
    • 12 October 2011
    1 Comment

    Six years ago an inner city fountain was transformed into a memorial for the victims of the Bali bombings. Today, skateboarders leap onto the ledge and glide on their back wheels. Skateboarding is a rebellious culture, yet it seems fitting that a monument to peoples' lives be filled with life.

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  • RELIGION

    Making friends not foes of rights and religion

    • Frank Brennan
    • 13 September 2011
    5 Comments

    The Church of the 21st century should be the exemplar of due process, natural justice and transparency. While there can be little useful critique of the final decision of Pope Benedict to force the early retirement of Bishop Bill Morris, there is plenty of scope to review the processes leading up to it.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Songs of England at war

    • Philip Harvey
    • 23 February 2011
    3 Comments

    Gallipolli was a disaster and a relatively minor conflict, but it is upon such 'minor' conflicts that Empires are built. These songs go to the heart of a contradictory dilemma: the love of country on the one hand and the ugly extremes of patriotism on the other. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Swimming in ink

    • Vin Maskell
    • 17 November 2010
    7 Comments

    He is out there, a fellow water man, in the real dark, in the blue-black ink. I am just here in the shallows, for I am not a swimmer. I can neither see him nor hear him but know he is there because his bike and his clothes are in their usual spot by the footpath.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dream of me

    • Graeme Kinross-Smith
    • 23 February 2010
    4 Comments

    when I get there driving through the night rain's sheen .. I come on myself already asleep in the bed .. mouth ajar head resting on one elbow .. drawing off gloves I bend down .. to look more closely. I see my face ...

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Thorpe moving mountain of Indigenous disadvantage

    • Michael Mullins
    • 27 July 2009
    4 Comments

    It's not uncommon for celebrities to get involved in charity work. Ian Thorpe's monumental speech to the Beyond Sport Summit in London articulating his resolve to tackle Indigenous disadvantage suggests he is far ahead of the pack.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    My father's tools

    • Tom Petsinis
    • 16 June 2009
    2 Comments

    It's a decade since you died .. But they remain, a legacy of sorts .. I see you in the shape of my hand .. Rummaging for the nail .. That crucifies father to son

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Xenia, the first safety net

    • Jaya Savige
    • 09 January 2008

    How could they intuit the pricelessness of a warm welcome? / benign as Mugabe, market forces the not-so-new religion From 9 August 2007.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Xenia, the first safety net

    • Jaya Savige
    • 08 August 2007

    How could they intuit the pricelessness of a warm welcome? / benign as Mugabe, market forces the not-so-new religion

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