keywords: Indus River

  • ECONOMICS

    Wall Street Blues

    • Jim McDermott
    • 20 October 2008
    6 Comments

    As I walk the streets of Manhattan, things seem much the same as always. Yet newspapers are peppered with references to the market 'cratering', a term that conjures the desolate landscape of the moon. A friend suggested another interpretation: 'A crater is what's left after a massive explosion.'

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Educating leaders for the contemporary Australian Church

    • Frank Brennan
    • 06 October 2008

    'Lee and Christine Rush are your average Ozzie couple, except that their teenage son Scott is on death row in Bali having been convicted of being a hapless drug mule. It will not go down well on the streets of Jakarta if Australians are baying for the blood of the Bali bombers one month and then pleading to save our sons and daughters the next month.'

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Paying the climate change piper

    • Tony Kevin
    • 09 September 2008
    7 Comments

    In The Pied Piper of Hamelin, a town tries to buy a cheap solution to a terrible problem, and their children pay the price. In light of Garnaut's latest, coservative climate change recommendations, it seems we may need a Class 5 tropical cyclone slamming into Brisbane to jolt us into decisive action.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Dignity the question for 'dirt poor' islanders

    • Michael Mullins
    • 25 August 2008
    5 Comments

    The Coalition opposes the Government's Pacific Guest Worker scheme due to a range of 'unanswered questions'. Brendan Nelson's 'dirt poor Pacific islanders' jibe suggests that fear, not compassion, fuels these concerns.

    READ MORE
  • INTERNATIONAL

    Dummy cops leave child porn unchecked

    • Harry Nicolaides
    • 29 July 2008
    11 Comments

    Fibreglass police officers man checkpoints on the road to the Thai-Burmese border crossing at Mai Sai. At a market on the Burma side of the border, child pornography is peddled by the world's most malevolent cottage industry.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Echoes of Calwell in Sudanese refugee cut

    • David Holdcroft
    • 17 October 2007
    6 Comments

    Is Australia's refugee resettlement program primarily intended to help asylum seekers, or assist Australia's economy and nation-building? We need to ask on which set of values we want to base our society.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Critics with the measure of a good film

    • Richard Leonard
    • 03 October 2007
    1 Comment

    Accepting a peer award recently, Sydney Morning Herald film critic Paul Byrnes declared serious film criticism to be in trouble. 'Much of the public now believes that a great film can't be great unless the box office makes it great.' He has a point.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Recherche Bay researcher aided natural beauty preservation

    • Peter Pierce
    • 13 June 2007
    1 Comment

    Five years ago, when Recherche Bay in Tasmania's far south was threatened with logging, the heritage importance of the area had to be freshly and strenuously established. The work of local historian Bruce Poulson proved crucial.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    A nuclear reactor in my back yard

    • Colin Brown
    • 13 June 2007
    2 Comments

    In 1996, Lucas Heights was renamed Barden Ridge, in order to preserve property values. Few people enjoy living near a nuclear reactor. Many also doubt that building more nuclear reactors will provide an answer to our run away greenhouse gas emissions.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    The road not taken

    • Stephen Yorke
    • 18 May 2007

    Stephen Yorke considers the effects of the decisions we make.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Our deathly cars and trucks

    • Clare Coburn
    • 02 April 2007

    Images from the Burnley tunnel accident showed thick plumes of smoke billowing from the outlet chimney. If a shark kills a lone swimmer off a beach, we call for netting or shooting. We have a much more lenient attitude towards roads.

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    Triumph of the tree huggers

    • Tim Thwaites
    • 27 February 2007

    In the past six months, climate change has gone from an idea which may have some future relevance to something which is already happening around us. Each region of the world seems to have had its own epiphany over climate change.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up