keywords: On Being Liked

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Irish radical Jesuit's life down under

    • Val Noone
    • 04 September 2009
    7 Comments

    At the height of Willam Hackett's republican involvements, the Jesuit provincial offered him a choice of silence or appointment to Australia. Through a combination of personal memoir and public history, Brenda Niall unravels the riddles of Hackett's life.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Irreconcilable dissonance and other reasons for divorce

    • Brian Doyle
    • 15 July 2009
    8 Comments

    Marriages are houses and unless you keep cleaning, repainting and using duct tape with deft punctilio, everything sags and mould wins. The first divorce I saw up close, like the first car crash you see up close, is imprinted on the inside of my eyelids.

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  • MEDIA

    Sri Lanka's war of propaganda

    • Paul Farrell
    • 26 May 2009
    6 Comments

    The Sri Lankan Government has been accused of endangering and killing civilians. The Tamil Tigers have been accused of using civilians as human shields. While the fog of war may be dissipating, media on the ground continue to be stifled.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Portrait of the nun as a larrikin activist

    • Andrena Jamieson
    • 17 April 2009

    Loreto Sister Veronica Brady has taken on the Government for its treatment of Indigenous Australians, the church for its treatment of women, and Australian society for its materialism. She belongs to the long tradition of Australian stirrers.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Journalism's life after death

    • John Cokley
    • 20 March 2009
    2 Comments

    Despite what Big Media bigwigs say, there is an alternative to the journalism of Murdoch, Fairfax, the ABC, BBC, CNN and Reuters. In fact there are many alternatives. This is news to many journalists, judging by the industry moaning.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The human face of a 'metaphorical' poet

    • Garry Kinnane
    • 04 March 2009
    6 Comments

    In 1972 Auden abandoned New York to live at Christ Church College, Oxford. He was given a cottage in the grounds, and was expected to give occasional talks and be available to students. It turned out not to be the success everyone had hoped for.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    All that jazz

    • Grant Fraser
    • 24 January 2009

    To an outsider jazz might seem a mysterious, prowling place because it defies simple definition. This is a journal for slow reading, recommend to those who are not jazz devotees and do not prowl ... yet.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Abbott's complex Aboriginal odyssey

    • Brian McCoy
    • 04 September 2008
    11 Comments

    The news Tony Abbott would spend three weeks in a remote Aboriginal community came as a pleasant surprise to many. He gave himself a chance to learn, and his reflections reveal a genuine interest in the lives of the people.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    What nuns contributed to patient care

    • Frank Bowden
    • 16 May 2008
    10 Comments

    Modern hospital management theory recognises the importance of workplace culture but doesn't know how to create one that works for the sick. Hosptials need to recapture a philosophy of practice that is lived, not written down in unread mission statements.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Revelations of a responsible literary citizen

    • Brian Doyle
    • 26 March 2008

    You find all kinds of books in people's cars — from novels and comics to atlases and bibles. The books people carry reveal something of their life and experiences.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Good politician

    • Tony Smith
    • 14 November 2007
    1 Comment

    Occasionally individuals manage to defy the negative stereotypes and demonstrate that being a Member of Parliament need not destroy one’s personal integrity. The late Peter Andren, federal member for Calare from 1996 to 2007, was just such an exceptional representative.

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  • RELIGION

    Protecting human rights in the next Federal Parliament - Frank Brennan

    • Frank Brennan
    • 25 October 2007

    There are times when we Australians get the balance between national interest and individual liberty wrong, especially when the individual is a member of a powerless minority. One way of improving the balance is including the judiciary in the calculus, as has now happened in the United Kingdom and New Zealand.

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