keywords: Pain

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • FAITH DOING JUSTICE

    A guide to pragmatic climate action

    • Chris Middleton
    • 25 June 2019

    In addressing these issues as priorities, I would argue for not focusing on big ideological statements or on a one-size fits all climate policy, but rather invest in the resilience and adaptability of a capitalist/consumer system to meet our environmental concerns.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Sri Lanka limps on from bloody Easter Sunday

    • Devana Senanayake
    • 24 June 2019
    1 Comment

    During Poson, a celebration of the entrance of Buddhism into Sri Lanka, I passed three tents presenting free sago, tea and jaggery. Though the fanfare of past years did not exist, it appears the country, though still damaged, is limping through to recovery. But can this recovery be sustained if the emotional pain is still to be unpacked?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Local solutions to global refugee malaise

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 13 June 2019
    5 Comments

    This year many people will celebrate Refugee Week as a wake. During the recent election the hopes of many people seeking protection and supporting them in different ways were raised by the prospect of a change of government. For those of us who share their pain it is time to reflect more broadly on the situation we now face.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Separating refugee policy from politics

    • Carolina Gottardo and Nishadh Rego
    • 06 June 2019
    17 Comments

    The recent federal election showed us that refugees and people seeking asylum do not need to be instrumentalised for votes. Perhaps refugee policymaking could be separated from politics. Perhaps it could be evidence-based and humane. Alas, the prevailing frames and politics of border protection quickly came to the fore post-election.

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  • RELIGION

    Mother Merle shows me how to die

    • Barry Gittins
    • 05 June 2019
    6 Comments

    At 4am on a cold morning, my brother phoned from the hospital. My final conversation with my mother, while harrowing, was not unexpected. My attempts to thank her for who she was and what she had given to me did not suffice. Mother Merle was in a hurry to leave this life, and the cancer that had drained her strength. She was over it.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    After the massacre

    • Colleen Keating
    • 03 June 2019
    6 Comments

    One hundred and eighty years on, we walk the Myall Creek Memorial Way ... there's a quietness amidst our camaraderie ... murdering rage and gall are quieted, smell of gun powder spent, yet screams that cried that stark cold night still sigh amidst the sway ...

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  • RELIGION

    More than rules, Church needs a change of heart

    • Tracey Edstein
    • 30 May 2019
    19 Comments

    There are guidelines, rules and laws galore. None of these stopped clergy and church personnel abusing children, or necessarily led those in authority to act. The community could therefore be forgiven a certain scepticism. Legislative changes, stronger governance and mission statements mean little without a change of heart.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Revisiting Iola Mathews' feminist battlegrounds

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 28 May 2019
    5 Comments

    To anyone pressing for social change after the recent election, the Hawke years must seem as far removed as Camelot. Iola Mathews describes the personal and political struggle involved in pressing for any reform. It is a timely book.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Undoubting Thomas

    • Paul Scully
    • 27 May 2019

    I closed my eyes to draw new thought. When I reopened them an empty stone slab lay before me in a cavern rough-hollowed but flooded with a light that had penetrated its roof. Mary hovered in the light, as a gull is both sea and air, in a flowing robe, her outstretched hand bearing the cincture I would need to recount the mystery to the others.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A medieval light on modern day darkness

    • Brian Matthews
    • 22 May 2019
    1 Comment

    For modern readers of Huizinga's The Autumn of the Middle Ages, there is a curious kind of double vision. While 21st century life has incomparably eclipsed medieval counterparts, there are aspects of the comparison that remain at least intriguing and, in some cases, enlightening.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Aboriginal issues are still not a vote-winner

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 10 May 2019
    7 Comments

    We can tell the Morrison government has no interest in Indigenous affairs because, apart from some money for suicide prevention programs (albeit less than half that requested), its budget showed a series of cuts. There is a lot of unfinished business to be addressed before it makes sense to adopt a voice to Parliament in the Constitution.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    On first reading Boochani on Manus

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 07 May 2019
    10 Comments

    No Friend But the Mountains deservedly won an Australian prize but was considered ineligible for others because the writer was not Australian. The book itself mocks that exclusion. Boochani's years on Manus Island branded him as Australian in the same way African slaves became American by the brand American owners burned on to them.

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