keywords: The Joy Of Being Wrong

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    The roots of Obama's Afghanistan strategy

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 10 July 2009
    4 Comments

    The current strategy is underpinned by a consensus on counter-insurgency that has gained ground since 2007. Marine Brigadier General Nicholson advocates drinking tea and eating goat with the locals, over and above firing bullets.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Cousins, Chaser and the court of public morality

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 15 June 2009
    3 Comments

    What do footballers who give photographers the bird, comedians who make jokes about sick children, boat owners who bring asylum seekers to Australian shores, cooks who swear, and cricketers who drink have in common?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Mem Fox and the parable of the green sheep

    • Sarah Kanowski
    • 13 January 2009
    1 Comment

    Working mums were 'offended' and 'disgusted' by Mem Fox's childcare slam. Other critics berated 'selfish mothers' and a society sick with affluenza. There was one word missing word from all the brouhaha: 'fathers'. (September 2008)

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Obama's victory for the art of the possible

    • Jim McDermott
    • 06 November 2008
    5 Comments

    Standing amidst the euphoric crowds in Times Square, it was like we were all in a fairy tale, waking from a horrible dream. That's not to say the problems our world faces are no less large or scary. But we've been reminded that more is possible than that which meets the eye.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Mem Fox and the parable of the green sheep

    • Sarah Kanowski
    • 10 September 2008
    15 Comments

    Working mums were 'offended' and 'disgusted' by Mem Fox's childcare slam. Other critics berated 'selfish mothers' and a society sick with affluenza. There was one word missing word from all the brouhaha: 'fathers'.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Incivility trumps the empty dance of manners

    • Brian Doyle
    • 25 June 2008
    5 Comments

    One time we were in a meeting when a very important person proposed a very stupid idea. We knew our uncivil friend would pop a gasket, and he did, albeit in memorably incisive fashion. The silence that followed was a remarkable sound.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Humanity reflected in the diversity of books

    • Brian Doyle
    • 21 April 2008

    Like people, no book is exactly symmetrical. Often the cover belies the interior, just as the bright faces of people often hide the stories beneath. Many we ignore too easily, a million we will never know, such being the way of the world.

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  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    Meeting the moral cost of recreational travel

    • Sophie Rudolph
    • 13 December 2007

    International travel requires ethical justification. This can be achieved through a traveller's deliberate attempt to enter into conversation with those whose land is visited.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The human rights cost of intelligence activities

    • Bill Calcutt
    • 17 October 2007

    A primary objective of terrorism is to engender disproportionate fear in the community, and to act as a catalyst for negative changes. Terrorists can therefore be highly effective without having to undertake terrorism operations.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A voice for victims of the sex trade

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 22 August 2007

    The Jammed is a frank and gritty cinematic reminder that the issue of human trafficking is not just on Australia’s doorstep—tragically, it’s part of the furniture. The most unsettling human degradation is protected by walls of silence and secrecy, and is the oxygen that keeps the sex industry alive.

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  • INFORMATION

    A selection of some of the letters regarding Frank Brennan's most recent piece

    • 13 July 2007

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Rudd and Gillard enjoy the bounce

    • Jack Waterford
    • 23 December 2006

    Kevin Rudd and Julia Gillard are enjoying their bounce, and their honeymoon, as John Howard predicted they would. Early polls suggest a marked upsurge in the Labor vote, in approval for the Labor leadership change, and in comparisons between the performance of Rudd and the Prime Minister. Were an election to be held now, one might think Labor would romp it in.

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