keywords: Utopia

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Best of 2010: Germaine Greer's utopia

    • Jasmine-Kim Westendorf
    • 14 January 2011
    1 Comment

    Some say that not only is The Female Enuch of little relevance today: it never was relevant. Such arguments are often based more on attacks on Greer personally, and feminism generally, than considered critiques of the value of the feminist agenda set out in the book.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Utopianism could fix politics

    • Colin Long
    • 06 September 2010
    7 Comments

    On the most important issues facing the nation, indeed the world — climate change — we have had a Prime Minister who vaguely recognises the problem but resists doing anything about it, and an opposition leader who trivialises it to a question of tax.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Germaine Greer's utopia

    • Jasmine-Kim Westendorf
    • 22 March 2010
    13 Comments

    Some say that not only is The Female Enuch of little relevance today: it never was relevant. Such arguments are often based more on attacks on Greer personally, and feminism generally, than considered critiques of the value of the feminist agenda set out in the book.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A discovery of connections

    • Najma Sambul
    • 11 February 2020
    1 Comment

    The group had come together by the chance enquiry from one churchgoer who asked another if they could dedicate time to this — to us. So, we clambered into a mini van with our meagre possessions, and the myths and half-truths we knew about Australia followed suit.

    READ MORE
  • MEDIA

    Why the media downplays Invasion Day

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 30 January 2020
    20 Comments

    At what point is the media going to realise that the Invasion Day rally, which has been going on in some form or other since 1938, is not going away and, indeed, is growing? I'm convinced the media don't want to report Invasion Day, as reminding the public to fear Indigenous people and our rights has been their practice for centuries now.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ormiston Gorge revelation

    • James Orrock
    • 20 January 2020
    1 Comment

    Rest in late afternoon silence, the vision quest in flight / Red ramparts attenuate to pink mauve in muted light; / Only gold could slake the Depression fever of Lewis Lasseter / Lead to an alchemy of empty jam tins and broken beer bottles / Fibula and femur disjoint, wrecked on iron pyrite reefs.

    READ MORE
  • ECONOMICS

    Ways out of the capitalist rabbit hole

    • David James
    • 21 October 2019
    5 Comments

    Recognising that financial systems are a human creation rather than natural systems governed by 'capital flows' would be an important step to conceiving a more robust and equitable system. To ask what kind of society we want and only then work out what we want money to do for us is to put the horse back in front of the cart.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Hiroshima and Transfiguration

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 13 August 2019
    22 Comments

    One event, recalling the revelation of Jesus' relationship to God, is a feast of light; the other, recalling man's inhumanity to man, speaks of darkness. Both are pointers to possible human futures: one of glory and the other of annihilation. The history of nuclear weapons and recent developments present this choice more starkly.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In dialogue with China's avant-garde

    • Jeremy Clarke
    • 06 February 2019
    2 Comments

    The exhibition stands as a celebration of the work of Xiao Lu and her contemporaries, who continue to clothe their lived experiences in images, acts and utterances, and in so doing communicate with others about the state of their lives as women and artists, their society and their nation.

    READ MORE
  • ECONOMICS

    We need to redefine exclusion

    • John Falzon
    • 21 January 2019
    22 Comments

    Inequality is not an aberration that comes with neoliberalism. It is the foundation of neoliberalism, along with its partners in social crime: patriarchy and colonisation. As Sharan Burrow, the Australian General Secretary of the ITUC, puts it so poignantly: 'We live in a fragmented world.' The excluded form the majority across the globe.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Nauru children: Why did we wait so long?

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 03 November 2018
    11 Comments

    To distant observers the hesitation and delay are hard to understand. They ask how it is possible to look on idle and unmoved at children in despair when you are in a position to address the causes of their despair. What is it that enables us to pass by damaged children, untroubled? The answer may lie in the quality of our moral imagination.

    READ MORE
  • MEDIA

    Our media's vested interest in racism

    • Celeste Liddle
    • 08 October 2018
    8 Comments

    Most of the requests wanted my slant on the racist cartoon, the blackface incident or the girl who wouldn't stand for the anthem. They weren't interested in delving into the systemic issues which led to most of those other situations. Most wanted Aboriginal opinion for the purposes of producing clickbait.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up