Search Results: poetry

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Cycling rhythms of eternity

    • Deanne Davies
    • 15 July 2018
    2 Comments

    Movements of time — Farewell to ancient granite. Greetings to gleaming streams and striating ribbons of colour.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A snatch of memory

    • Elaine Barker
    • 08 July 2018

    She was in her eighties then. And I was thirteen. Now eighty, I've retrieved that memory of hers and hold it as I would my own.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The woman who got me into Ned Kelly’s funeral

    • Martin Flanagan
    • 01 July 2018
    6 Comments

    We share a love of poetry, having come to Gerard Manley Hopkins from opposite directions, her from religious ecstasy, me from the dark sonnets. In the 1980s we met, in a shelter for Aboriginal women in Collingwood. My next memory? Ursula introducing me to the granddaughter of Kelly's sweetheart, an old woman dying in a Melbourne hospital.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Civilisation beyond the con of neoliberalism

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 25 June 2018
    35 Comments

    Just in time to arrest ponderous musings about Western Civilisation, up jumps Denniss' cheeky funeral oration for the neoliberal settlement. His target is the assumption that an economy based on unregulated competition between individuals will benefit society. He does not spend time arguing with the theory, but points to the results.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Keep this message with you forever

    • William Okello Kadima
    • 24 June 2018

    I know we are a cultured society that forbids ever talking about 'if tomorrow never comes'. But tomorrow is never a promise to anyone.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Man with secret lives

    • David Lander
    • 19 June 2018
    2 Comments

    When I drink coffee I roll it over my tongue and remember how I grew the beans myself on my own plantations in Guatamala. I hope my secret family there is doing well. I captain this battleship in tight formation with destroyers and frigates. My contemporary dance company is in constant demand. I am a busy man but I sleep well.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    An old poet scales the age barrier

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 19 June 2018
    11 Comments

    An old man boarded the bus, seating himself next to me and behind the boys. He was unshaven, and his jeans had seen better days. He sat quietly for a few minutes, observing the scene, and then he tapped the nearest boy on the shoulder. 'I'm impressed by your enthusiasm, and it so happens I've written a poem about that subject. Here it is.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Submission to the elements

    • Tony London
    • 03 June 2018
    4 Comments

    Winter fronts roll through, we have had our tongues out for rain, genuflected in case it may have helped, and now another scud rattling on the tin roof, gutters run over like a gushing bereavement.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Remembering the many-sided Brian Doyle

    • Philip Harvey
    • 27 May 2018
    3 Comments

    The evidence, from one line onwards, was unmistakeable Doyle. Imitation was impossible, self-parody ditto. Gore Vidal loved to say that Tennessee Williams knew how to do only one thing, but he did that thing better than anyone else. Brian Doyle's poetry was a bit like that.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A painter's lament

    • Clotilde Lopez
    • 20 May 2018
    1 Comment

    If you listen carefully, the sound of each colour can be heard, the scrunch of each mineral discerned, each cadence, a trace of its former life, a finer distinction. Relieved of its cumbersome form, it becomes lighter and mixes with white spirit like a cocktail blast of violets, mauves and ochres, ground to a fine powder and wet with new life.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Chelsea Manning at Guangzhou Airport

    • Barnaby Smith
    • 13 May 2018
    1 Comment

    ... the actuality of Her and me growing dimmer as the distorted glow of a new morning's haze illuminates factories in the distance as if deleted scenes ...

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The meek find the violent absolute

    • Carolyn Masel
    • 06 May 2018

    Early traumas last, the experts say ... but memory can resemble an old wound that presages damp days or, like a sharp new line, make one gasp again. What violence do they endure who with nightmare slowness flee a wolfish past? And are theirs unexamined lives who have attained the modern armour-plated dream?

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