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Keywords: British Museum

  • AUSTRALIA

    Exceptional Thatcher and the feminist fallacy

    • Ruby Hamad
    • 15 April 2013
    26 Comments

    Whereas feminism realises the inherent potential and worth in all women, Exceptional Women succeed because of their perceived likeness, not to other women, but to men. Consequently, they make things harder, not easier, for other women. Margaret Thatcher was many things, but she absolutely was not a feminist.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Forgotten Aboriginal war heroes

    • Paul W. Newbury
    • 19 April 2011
    21 Comments

    In 1790, resistance hero Pemulwuy killed Governor Phillip's convict gamekeeper for his abuse of Aboriginal women. The subsequent Frontier Wars raged for 140 years. Anzac celebrations tend to neglect the many Indigenous Australians who died in defence of their land.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The religious beliefs of Australia's prime ministers

    • John Warhurst
    • 11 November 2010
    12 Comments

    Nine prime ministers have been observant Christians. Two have been conventional Christians. Ten have been nominal Christians. Five have been articulate atheists or agnostics. One was a nominal atheist or agnostic.

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  • RELIGION

    Rethinking indigeneity in the age of globalisation

    • Frank Brennan
    • 01 November 2010
    3 Comments

    There is an emerging Aboriginal middle class. The contested questions in those communities relate to the expensive delivery of services including health, housing and education. The contested issue in the urban community is over self-identification as Aboriginal by persons of mixed descent.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Why ignorance, not greed, caused the GFC

    • Neil Ormerod
    • 20 October 2009
    2 Comments

    Sixty years ago, Jesuit Bernard Lonergan developed an analysis of the boom and bust cycles of economy. He often asked, 'Where were the Christian counter-parts of Karl Marx, sitting in the British Museum voraciously reading and relentlessly studying about political economy?'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Models for a good life and an honest death

    • Clive O'Connell
    • 16 October 2006

    Historian Inga Clendinnen's reviews, childhood recollections, multi-coloured reminiscences of her working career, and informed discourse on simple events or complex ideas, are collected in a way that reveals a tempered tolerance seemingly inherited from her favourite essayist, Montaigne.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The simple pleasure of collecting an author’s works

    • Paul Daffey
    • 18 September 2006

    Of those who collect books, some might have copies of the 12 novels written by Patrick White. Or the 50 written by Jon Cleary. Few collectors, however, could hope to match Stewart Russell’s collection of books by the late English writer John Creasey, who wrote almost 800 books.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Could their telly be worse than their soccer?

    • Juliette Hughes
    • 06 July 2006

    ‘Do try and get out a bit when you’re there,’ said a concerned friend. ‘You know what you’re like about British telly.’

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The frontier fallen

    • Tom Griffiths
    • 05 July 2006

    Historians are fighting a mini war over frontier history and the number of Aboriginal dead. Tom Griffiths argues for a different approach.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Howletts

    • Juliette Hughes
    • 04 July 2006

    Juliette Hughes talks with the animals.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The brush and the pen

    • Peter Steele
    • 01 July 2006

    Art speaks, but we sometimes need translation

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  • AUSTRALIA

    News from all over

    • Anthony Ham, David Glanz, Morag Fraser
    • 16 June 2006

    Death of the king, Little argument, Words to end winter

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