Keywords: Celebrity

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Art and the Piss Christ umbrella

    • Jessica Frawley
    • 02 March 2009
    8 Comments

    Paintings that once would have once sparked controversy now adorn biscuit tins, umbrellas, notebooks and a range of other merchandise. We have killed the controversy and challenges faced in the past by branding it to death.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    When Leonard Cohen prays

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 February 2009
    13 Comments

    The world of pop music is dominated by prettiness and skin-deep perfection. In that context, Cohen's greatness is not instantly discernable. Lately a Buddhist, he has spent his latter years in study of religion — 'But cheerfulness keeps breaking through.'

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ode to the white cuppa

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 05 November 2008
    3 Comments

    First she gave up sugar in her tea. His Catholic guilt nagged him, and he followed suit. Then came fat-free milk. There is a puritan streak in today's narcissistic culture of gyms and dieting that makes anathema many of life's little luxuries.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Bad day pose

    • Isabella Fels
    • 21 October 2008
    2 Comments

    I've let you down by not looking after you ... By pretending to be your closest intimate buddy ... But leaving you for dead ... Every time my other friend ... The fridge entices me with her sensuous delights...

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Neither Scott nor Amrozi deserves death

    • Frank Brennan
    • 17 October 2008
    31 Comments

    We should feel deep regret when the bullets pierce the hearts of the Bali Bombers. Neither just nor useful, the death penalty is immoral. Prime Minister Rudd is well positioned to contribute to its abolition.

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    Killing people for killing people

    • Frank Brennan
    • 17 October 2008
    9 Comments

    'For me, talk of the death penalty evoked the young, frightened faces of Scott and Emmanuel, as well as the laughing, haughty faces of Amrozi, Mukhlas and Imam Samudra.' Full text from Frank Brennan's session on 'Killing People for Killing People', Ubud Writers Festival, 17 October 2008.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dull Duchess

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 02 October 2008

    Famous for being famous, the Duchess of Devonshire is an independent woman in a man's world. A more substantial script might have evoked the subordinate role of women in Western politics, or slyly spoofed the cult of celebrity.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Auctioning Jane Austen's hair

    • P. S. Cottier
    • 16 September 2008

    Do they stroke it with avid fingers, this palm tree lock that once grew from the full head of quietest genius? .. Scalping would be too much, headhunting too tropical .. but buying the hair of a dead woman you can't know .. is quite the thing

    READ MORE
  • ENVIRONMENT

    At odds with the 'celebrity science'

    • Marko Beljac
    • 23 July 2008
    9 Comments

    It is easier to get a job or get on the box doing superstring theory — the elusive 'theory of everything'. Progress in the field is being conducted without reference to empirical reality, revealing a market driven form of collective irrationality.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Childlike wonder redeems inscrutable Houdini

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 March 2008

    Tough times call for tough measures — the McGarvie women comprise a single-parent family in a male-dominated society, so you can hardly blame them for making a living the best way they can. Houdini is all charm and showmanship, with hidden depths and dark secrets.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Good music becomes great business

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 13 December 2007

    In the world of popular music, the transition from intimate theatre or festival gigs, to stadium rock shows, indicates the move from an authentic emphasis on great music, to 'music as spectacle', or pure commerce. It appears Missy Higgins has reached this point.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Dylan writ vain but vulnerable

    • Rochelle Siemienowicz
    • 12 December 2007

    The most recognisable Bob Dylan in this multi-Dylan film is infuriating. Hollow, vain and abusive. But also vulnerable and pitiable; an angry animal pacing his cage.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up