Keywords: Compassion

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    21st century protest from Cairo to Don Dale

    • Marta Skrabacz
    • 04 December 2017
    4 Comments

    There’s no reason to judge the success of a protest by whether it achieved its desired outcome: the adage ‘it’s a marathon, not a sprint’ rings true. Effective change is a matter of increment; it has to happen at every strata of society. Protests bear the brunt of proving success, when the burden for change actually exists with the system they’re opposing.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Local councils helping lift the unemployed

    • El Gibbs
    • 30 November 2017
    3 Comments

    A group of people living on income support has been working with local councils across Adelaide to ask them to advocate on their behalf. As Newstart payments remain pitifully low, councils are caught up in these issues because they run community services that support the unemployed.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    With remembrance goes compassion: Manus

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 26 November 2017
    21 Comments

    The refugees on Manus Island are not simply actors in a dramatic poem. They are human beings like us to whom we have a responsibility. They could have enriched us by their ingenuity and bravery had we accepted them. We should continue to listen to their voices and keep them in our hearts.

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  • RELIGION

    Playing second fiddle to Magda on marriage

    • Frank Brennan
    • 25 October 2017
    76 Comments

    I said I would be very happy to play second fiddle. I wanted my presence to assist a respectful dialogue. I wanted to make it clear that a thinking and compassionate Catholic could have good reasons for voting yes. I wanted to insist that respect and endorsement of loving same sex relationships did not preclude consideration of issues such as freedom of religion.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    An interplanetary future favours the wealthy

    • Francine Crimmins
    • 19 September 2017
    11 Comments

    In a ball of fire, Cassini's 20-year journey across the solar system came to an abrupt finale last week. The spacecraft's odyssey soon revealed not 12 but 62 moons orbiting the gas giant. The most significant of these is Titan, which harbours large quantities of liquid water, considered to be essential to the existence of life. Meanwhile back on Earth ...

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sidelining diversity in Stephen King's IT

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 14 September 2017
    1 Comment

    When it comes to creative license, a necessity when adapting a novel of the scope of IT, every decision comes with costs and benefits. In an era where creators of popular entertainment are increasingly, and rightly, held to account over matters of representation, it is strange and disappointing that decisions would be made where the cost is to reduce a major, richly written character to a mere side note, and in so doing to diminish diversity, in a story that already sorely lacks it.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The beloved countries are still crying

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 23 August 2017
    9 Comments

    Seventy years ago Alan Paton wrote Cry the Beloved Country. His novel opened many Australians’ eyes to the wounded South Africa that lay behind its colonial surface. His elegiac conclusion was prescient of the two generations that followed.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The lessons learned from charitable work

    • Mariana James-Techera
    • 19 August 2017
    4 Comments

    We students go to school to learn. But one of the best learning experiences for me has happened outside school: helping the less fortunate by serving them food at the Sacred Heart Mission and collecting food necessities for the charity.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A world of majesty and cruelty

    • Catherine Marshall
    • 11 August 2017
    14 Comments

    We have just taken off from Dubai for St Petersburg. My son is marvelling at the immensity of Dubai’s airport—now officially the busiest in the world. We have stood on a bus—stifling, cramped—and boarded our air-conditioned connecting flight with a deep sense of relief. We have watched the planes lining up behind ours on the shimmering tarmac, and have noted the outside temperature flashing on the screen: 44 degrees Celsius. Thank God we’re getting out of here. 

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    The empty moral calculus of Turnbull and Trump

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 10 August 2017
    17 Comments

    The Turnbull-Trump tapes took one back. For some, it was back to the Watergate Tapes and the innocent years of Richard Nixon. For those of us of a certain age and faith, it was back to the primitive and unenlightened world of Abraham.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The thin line between apes and humans

    • Megan Graham
    • 26 July 2017
    9 Comments

    I came to the Planet of the Apes films a little late, thinking it was just a bit too far on the silly side for my tastes. But with time to kill on a holiday in 2014, I watched Rise of the Planet of the Apes and Dawn of the Planet of the Apes and found myself surprisingly invested in the emotions of the characters. Released in Australia today is the latest episode: War for the Planet of the Apes.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A sensitive view of high school gay romance

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 29 June 2017
    1 Comment

    Some films seem custom made for the high school English curriculum. First Girl I Loved should be essential viewing and a conversation starter for teenagers and their parents, for its sensitive and authentic exploration of the lived experiences of young people coming to terms with their sexuality in a high school context.

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