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Keywords: Elizabeth Young

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The thirty good priests

    • Brian Doyle
    • 13 July 2010
    4 Comments

    For every greedy evil rapacious liar priest .. there are thirty great and subtle men .. Who wake alone quite early and don their vocations .. Willingly like a thorny endlessly tumultuous prayer

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Permutations of motherhood

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 June 2010

    Adoption is shown to be a tumultuous process, as joyful and painful in its own way as pregnancy and birth. Lucy is unable to conceive, but suspects that the motherly bond is about much more than biology. Her husband Joseph, by contrast, values biology greatly.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Prince William vs the Republic of Australia

    • John Warhurst
    • 25 January 2010
    18 Comments

    William's visit laid bare the weaknesses of members of the Royal Family as candidates for our head of state. The package represented by William should be anathema to modern Australia's constitutional future, whatever he might have to offer as a person.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Larrikin poet's Sentimental 'slanguage'

    • Brian Matthews
    • 16 September 2009
    3 Comments

    C. J. Dennis once wrote that, as a boy, he had 'a devout and urgent desire to become a larrikin'. The Songs of a Sentimental Bloke provides a window on part of Australian culture and the traditions, speech and images that forged it.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Feminist Christmas story

    • Dorothy A. Lee
    • 23 December 2008
    6 Comments

    Feminist biblical scholars ask two fundamental questions of the biblical nativity story. First they ask how female characters are portrayed. Second, they ask how these biblical myths can be reinterpreted in a woman-friendly (rather than misogynist) way.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Hamlet's complex adolescence

    • Ellena Savage
    • 24 October 2008
    2 Comments

    Marsden shows us Hamlet, Horatio and Ophelia as children playing in the forest. They discover a dying badger and agree it needs to be euthanised. Hamlet stalls.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The roots of Aboriginal activism

    • Brian McCoy
    • 06 June 2008
    2 Comments

    Events such as the National Apology and the Northern Territory Intervention loom large in the collective memory. Many of the struggles faced by early 20th century activist Fred Maynard regarding the protection of Indigenous rights remain with us today.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Buying and selling creativity

    • Malcolm King
    • 14 November 2007

    It's time we called big businesses' bluff about their appropriation of the term 'creativity'. For a truly creative nation to evolve, we need to study the wild mutability of the creative process.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Critics with the measure of a good film

    • Richard Leonard
    • 03 October 2007
    1 Comment

    Accepting a peer award recently, Sydney Morning Herald film critic Paul Byrnes declared serious film criticism to be in trouble. 'Much of the public now believes that a great film can't be great unless the box office makes it great.' He has a point.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Politically correct dancing

    • Richard Leonard
    • 02 April 2007
    1 Comment

    A new ocker comedy depicts young protégés at a suburban dance school immersing themselves in choreographies about starvation, people dying of AIDS and the nuclear holocaust.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Catastrophe on Australia's doorstep (Best articles of 2006 special edition)

    • Peter Cronau
    • 24 December 2006
    1 Comment

    Barely reported by Australia's media, Papua New Guinea's AIDS crisis is on track to cause the collapse of the country's economy, with AusAID forcasting a 37.5% decline in the labour force by 2020. From 3 October 2006.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Catastrophe on Australia's doorstep (photo essay)

    • Peter Cronau
    • 16 October 2006
    16 Comments

    Barely reported by Australia's media, Papua New Guinea's AIDS crisis is on track to cause the collapse of the country's economy, with AusAID forcasting a 37.5% decline in the labour force by 2020.

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