Keywords: Soviet

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Catholic writers' agnostic appeal

    • Lucas Smith
    • 29 February 2012
    7 Comments

    The priests are ineluctably compromised: one has capitulated to state pressure to marry; the other has fathered a daughter and drugs himself with alcohol. But the author's achievement, and a mark of his faith, is his ability to 'distinguish ... between the man and the office'.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Russia's concern for besieged Syrian Christians

    • Benedict Coleridge
    • 14 February 2012
    12 Comments

    Russia's opposition to military intervention or orchestrated regime change in Syria runs deeper than mere contemporary strategic interest. Its interest in Syria and the broader Middle East stems also from its historical conception of itself as the protector of eastern Christians.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    If Dickens were alive today

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 08 February 2012
    6 Comments

    If Dickens wished to address the deprivation and discrimination suffered by Indigenous Australians and asylum seekers today, he would need to turn to the popular media. But even though he was superbly gifted for the genre, his telly series would most likely flop. 

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Insanity rules after ten years of war in Afghanistan

    • Irfan Yusuf
    • 07 October 2011
    12 Comments

    Today is the tenth anniversary of the war on Afghan jihadists. We civilised Westerners decided we’d had enough of barbarians flying planes into our skyscrapers, killing thousands of our civilians. And hence we sent our own planes to drop huge bombs on their villages and towns.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Palestine takes a stab at statehood

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 23 September 2011
    8 Comments

    It has been said that giving certain countries independence was like giving a razor to a child. As Palestine makes its bid for full membership of the UN, it may do well to remember that any successful strategy should focus not on statehood but on rights.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Myths of wartime good and evil

    • Zac Alstin
    • 15 August 2011
    22 Comments

    It is a weakness of human nature that we forgive in our friends what we despise in our enemies. If Germany or Japan had achieved a nuclear weapon and launched it on an Allied city, our condemnation would be unrelenting.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Good journalism and Murdoch's pie-gate

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 21 July 2011
    1 Comment

    Rupert Murdoch's News International has found itself with more than egg on its face over the News of the World scandal. As this case reveals journalism at its most prurient and base, a new film pays tribute to journalism at its most noble and courageous. 

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    History continues in Egypt and Libya

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 13 March 2011
    6 Comments

    Political and social ideas are a means of conceptualising people's inner urgings and desires. Does the movement towards political change in the Middle East constitute an 'absolute moment' which forecasts the realisation of democratic governments across the Arab world?

    READ MORE
  • RELIGION

    A spiritual reading of the Egyptian Revolution

    • Henri Boulad
    • 08 March 2011
    2 Comments

    It is an absurd confrontation. On one side, a man with empty hands; on the other, a well organised force equipped with batons, helmets and shields. I can still see the young man, like a lion, throw himself against the wall of shields, face tensed, eyes flashing, heart steeled.

    READ MORE
  • MEDIA

    Women who discovered the world

    • Eleanor Massey
    • 10 February 2011
    5 Comments

    Adventure and travel writing has long been a male domain. Sports and media guru Peter FitzSimons advises young men to broaden their experience, find their voice, and 'push through the hard yakka'. He says this advice is not for young women. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The roots of American arrogance

    • Ben Coleridge
    • 01 October 2010
    9 Comments

    America has grown so used to triumphing in the conflicts of the 1990s that mere stasis is now easily viewed as retreat. But from Teddy Roosevelt to Barack Obama, each time America has become blind to the limitations of its power, it has been wrenched back to reality by failure.

    READ MORE
  • AUSTRALIA

    Utopianism could fix politics

    • Colin Long
    • 06 September 2010
    7 Comments

    On the most important issues facing the nation, indeed the world — climate change — we have had a Prime Minister who vaguely recognises the problem but resists doing anything about it, and an opposition leader who trivialises it to a question of tax.

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up