Keywords: Ten Short Poems

  • AUSTRALIA

    All that is solid melts into air

    • John Falzon
    • 20 January 2022

    Social security payments were once seen as a means of preventing poverty, not prescribing it. A job was once seen, at least for some, as being not only the best guarantee against poverty but the path to economic security. Now it seems, however, multiple jobs are required to stave off poverty.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ownership

    • Jamie Dawe
    • 06 December 2021

    I own my proclivities and short comings / I own the transgressions of those which have inflicted wounds some unhealed /  I own the sublime moments of subjective joy / I own little but I am rich in compassion / I own not the land it owns me

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Your poetry questions, answered

    • Philip Harvey
    • 04 November 2021
    8 Comments

      Although I teach poetry and do occasional workshops, the following is written in response to one such workshopper, new to writing poetry, who in lockdown would message me on social media with fairly open-ended questions about poetry. My answers are written after the wry manner of the Polish poet Wislawa Szymborska; wry, but generally helpful. They are not the launch pad for a new poetics. I have stopped for now at 12 questions, but the questions keep rolling in.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Amore mio

    • Ugo Rotellini
    • 11 October 2021
    1 Comment

    The neighbour says, So sorry. And sir, / you are the last paesano on this street. / Maria you promised me. I could go first. / Ti perdono, I forgive you, amore mio. / I sit in our backyard under lemon shade, amongst /  the hens tomato plants and capsicums. I fall into each / wishful memory. We danced, those ad-hoc strolls / and laughter, you hummed our favourite songs.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    A Timeless Deepness of Silence

    • John Cranmer
    • 28 September 2021

    In this experience of place and moment / is a knowing of timelessness / offering persistent invitation into a deepness of silence / Silence knowing and living out / the roots of a self-aware becoming / sometime known as eternity

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    20/20

    • Geoff Page
    • 14 September 2021
    2 Comments

    Once again we’re forced to think about the ones who’ve kept us going, doctors, nurses, nurses’ aides, swallowing their fear and knowing masks, however good, can never be sufficient, those who check each other’s PPE, all suited-up as if they planned a landing on the moon.  

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The peculiar freedom of being overlooked

    • P. S. Cottier
    • 27 April 2021
    6 Comments

    The female is mostly red, a painted nail crimson. The male a fervent green. That the female is gaudier has caused experts experty angst.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Clean on the surface

    • Gayelene Carbis
    • 16 March 2021
    6 Comments

    We will go to the laundry and finish coffee in time for the clothes to finish the wash cycle. This is called catching up with my father. He would say you don’t do this — you just don’t do that — talk about your dirty laundry in public.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Learn to live with a mountain between us

    • Wally Swist
    • 27 October 2020

    We might have learned that we can no longer feed on the leaves at the tops of the crowns, but need to bend our long necks, which we carry on our small body and relatively short legs, and we have retrained ourselves to consume the leaves on the lower limbs.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Spring is a hard season for the lonely

    • Peter Mitchell
    • 13 October 2020
    1 Comment

    Three plover chicks prow Torkina Park, parents at their helm: their heads alert, their eyes sails. If these were waters, the kookaburra in the grevillea branches above would be a shark.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Eighty years of tarnish

    • B. N. Oakman
    • 29 September 2020
    1 Comment

    The river flooded during the battle, surging so wide, so deep, that two days of eager slaughter were postponed. I won't polish away 80 years of tarnish. The brass cartridge still grips its bullet just the way you found it while walking your dogs. A misfire.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Today is longer than yesterday

    • Greg Tome
    • 18 August 2020

    Today is longer than yesterday, by a split second or so. We are being sucked towards indolent days that wade through heat and glare, numb the brain as it soaks in festive inanity.

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