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Keywords: The Spectator

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The wet sheep: a football eulogy

    • Brian Matthews
    • 07 October 2009
    1 Comment

    The one thing more potent than the anticipation of seeing your team in a grand final is the misery of seeing them defeated. A wet, bedraggled lamb glimpsed en route to Melbourne proved to be an ill omen for one footy fan.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    An end to rugby's unethical code

    • Tony Smith
    • 19 May 2009
    25 Comments

    It is time we stopped allowing football administrators, advertisers and television stations to set the standards for ethical behaviour. The only way that the current unethical rugby league culture can be removed is for the code itself to disappear.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Cinema: the secular temple

    • Barbara Creed and Richard Leonard
    • 18 March 2009
    3 Comments

    People have stopped going to church, but they still have an eye for and an expectation of the mystical. At the cinema, spectators, primed by the structures of the cinema itself, enter into a mystical experience with the shadow world being played out before them.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    How lax commentary is failing cricket

    • Tony Smith
    • 27 January 2009
    20 Comments

    Today's commentators seem determined to speak about anything but the cricket — their lunches, last night's frivolities, films, politics and, most of all, themselves. Much more than the Australian players, Test cricket commentators are in crisis.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Idealists don't own cricket

    • Tony Smith
    • 20 January 2008
    2 Comments

    Cricket is a microcosm of society and the furore over sportsmanship reflects the division of Australia into two classes — the venal, whose ultimate measure of success is the potential for profit, and the naïve, who believe in higher values.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Critics with the measure of a good film

    • Richard Leonard
    • 03 October 2007
    1 Comment

    Accepting a peer award recently, Sydney Morning Herald film critic Paul Byrnes declared serious film criticism to be in trouble. 'Much of the public now believes that a great film can't be great unless the box office makes it great.' He has a point.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Innocent happiness and heavily curtained windows

    • Michael Mullins
    • 25 July 2007

    The Australian character is set against that of the European nations from which the 'new Australians' arrived after World War II. For them, Australia offered "considerably safety and little menace", but heavily curtained windows rather than dancing in the streets they were accustomed to.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Saying thank you to an ambivalent society

    • Saeed Saeed
    • 13 June 2007
    3 Comments

    The Sudanese Lost Boys Association of Australia recently organised an Appreciation Day. The newly arrived South Sudanese community engaged in community work. Despite the jubilant atmosphere and images of the South Sudanese men, woman and children planting trees in the park, the most remarkable aspect of this event was that it happened at all.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Pomp and circumstance

    • Tim Martyn
    • 18 May 2007

    Tim Martyn gets up close and personal on the campaign trail

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The Rushdie of the West: Remembering Jean Baudrillard

    • Scott Stephens
    • 04 April 2007

    Scott Stephens on the passing of Jean Baudrillard.

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  • RELIGION

    St Patrick, a man before his time

    • Ursula Stephens
    • 26 March 2007
    2 Comments

    Even though St Patrick's Day has not yet arrived, I have already received several cards and messages. Some came the old-fashioned way, delivered by the postman, but most were like my friend Colleen's, the virtual variety, and arrived with a "ping' in my inbox.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    World Youth Day's ecological conversion opportunity

    • Stefan Gigacz
    • 08 March 2007
    9 Comments

    More than 100,000 international visitors are also expected at next year's World Youth Day event hosted by the Catholic Church in Sydney. A large number of these will arrive on flights close to 25 hours duration, putting 7-8 tonnes of carbon dioxide equivalent into the atmosphere.

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