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Keywords: Richard Gere

  • INTERNATIONAL

    Australia should resist totalising China narratives

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 01 July 2021
    28 Comments

    We should resist the pressure to regard China as our enemy. The pressure to do so is powerful, given the cycle of retaliatory words on both sides that further poison relationships. The impetus to enmity, however, damages both sides. To treat people as enemies means that they become enemies, with the result that both sides will spurn the mutual exchanges that can help each.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    International ecocide law could criminalise Reef destruction

    • Bronwyn Lay
    • 23 September 2016
    3 Comments

    Last year I sat in the offices of one of the judges of the International Criminal Court as we spoke about the possibility of ecocide law becoming an international crime against humanity. An international law against ecocide at its simplest is the criminalisation of mass destruction of the environment due to human action. At that time I heard that the obstacles were not legal, but political. Last week the ICC announced it may hold corporate executives and governments legally responsible for environmental crimes.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Greens' senate reform spin is sweetened nonsense

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 23 March 2016
    19 Comments

    The idea that these laws are, as Twomey writes, 'more conducive to representing the genuine choice of the people in electing their Senate' is untrue. It is a view expressed by Greens leader Senator Richard Di Natale, who suggested 'the Senate that's delivered after the next election is the one people vote for'. What these voting reforms actually serve to do is give the false impression of eliminating manipulation while diluting Australia's political base in favour of monochrome party politics.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Rhyme and ruin in Tony Abbott's court

    • Brian Matthews
    • 28 March 2014
    11 Comments

    Thomas Wyatt, poet and prominent figure in the court of Henry VIII, found life there not only perilous but repugnant and dreamed of escape. There is much that Wyatt would recognise in the court of Tony Abbott: the obsessive secrecy, the suspicion of foreigners, the cruelty, the ecclesiastical connections, the dames and knights, the aggressive Anglophilia. At least he wouldn't have had to encode his unease in poetry.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    We created the Manus Island danger

    • Moira Rayner
    • 20 February 2014
    38 Comments

    We created this risk, intending it to 'deter' boat people and people smugglers. As a consequence, we've created racial conflict in PNG and the collapse of the rule of law in Nauru. Now, it is surely a duty to re-evaluate a policy that leads to mental illness, destruction of property, hope, imagination and civil society, and death. I think we have a duty to refugees, because we are descended from refugees and may be refugees ourselves, one day.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Economic empire's unethical end

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 04 October 2012
    1 Comment

    Robert Miller has built an empire that is about to be sucked into the mire by a bad investment. Now he wants to offload it quickly before the purchaser realises anything is amiss. His practical obligations to his family and employees usurp his human obligations to those who become pawns in his efforts to maintain order.

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  • RELIGION

    Alain de Botton's pastoral atheism

    • Patrick McCabe
    • 22 February 2012
    22 Comments

    Where Richard Dawkins could be described as a missionary intent on saving souls from religion, fellow atheist de Botton is more concerned with the spiritual needs of the existing flock. His latest book Religion for Atheists is likely to annoy believers and non-believers alike.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    War on terror is beyond the joke

    • Justin Glyn
    • 21 December 2011
    4 Comments

    The US Congress' proposals to allow indefinite military detention of its citizens without charge or trial, and America's ongoing use of unmanned attack drones to assassinate opponents, highlight anew the need for clear thinking when it comes to that much abused term, 'war'.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Vegetarian's war on duck terror

    • Sarah McKenzie
    • 10 February 2010
    99 Comments

    While most states have banned recreational duck shooting, in Victoria it not only continues, but in 2010 will increase. The recreational hunting industry comes down to nothing more than the desire of a small number of mainly men who get a thrill from the kill.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Loving George W. Bush

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 05 March 2009
    4 Comments

    Those who expect a portrait of a monster will be disappointed. Stone's Bush is not exactly sympathetic. But he is human. He is even likeable.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Purging Howard's national insecurity

    • Tony Kevin
    • 04 April 2008
    1 Comment

    The most profound shock to Australian foreign policy was not 9/11 but our change of government in 1996. Under Rudd Labor, Australia's international agenda is once again becoming less about national security and more about being a good international citizen.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Playwrights finger reality missed by politicians

    • Richard Flynn
    • 09 January 2008

    As Australians wait for a Federal election, Hilary Glow’s book is timely evidence that what is wrong with the world is what politicians would have us believe. Contemporary playwrights are wrestling with the issues seen as crucial to the notion of who we really are as Australians in the twenty-first century. From 17 October 2007.

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