Keywords: Samuel Johnson

  • ECONOMICS

    The gift of work

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 13 August 2020
    6 Comments

    Amid the disruption of predictable life wrought by the coronavirus, governments have focused on jobs. Jobs lost in the response to the virus, and jobs created as we emerge from the crisis. The focus is worthy — behind each job lost is a person whose life has become anxious and uncertain. The language, however, is concerning. Defining the challenge as one of creating jobs expresses an understanding of work, the inadequacy of which the coronavirus has laid bare.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The days of the week

    • Philip Harvey
    • 20 April 2020
    4 Comments

    Reports of the rain are weak front, then strong. Sunshine headline news, or so it appears. I whisper the tune from a scratchy disc. Maybe Tuesday will be my good news day.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Clive James' poetry of memento mori

    • Philip Harvey
    • 29 November 2019
    12 Comments

    Obituarists sharpened their quills in 2014 when word had it the death of Clive James was imminent. Since then we have witnessed a late flowering of poetry, reviews and articles tinged with mortality that revealed to the last his Twainian flair for journalistic self-promotion, albeit in the internet age. Now the quills are out in earnest.

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  • MEDIA

    Elitism in online dictionaries

    • Philip Harvey
    • 27 March 2012
    19 Comments

    Free dictionaries on the internet are often bland and incomplete, while those that are complex and exhaustive require a credit card. Quality comes at a price, and this is an increasing educational issue. Rich institutions and individuals can pay for the words we all use, while others cannot, or just do not.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Libraries lead the e-book revolution

    • Philip Harvey
    • 01 March 2010
    9 Comments

    We are seeing only the early technology of the e-book. In five years the e-book will look, feel, sound, smell and gesticulate in very different ways from its iPad and Kindle prototypes. As usual, libraries are quietly ahead of everyone else.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Ode to the white cuppa

    • Frank O'Shea
    • 05 November 2008
    3 Comments

    First she gave up sugar in her tea. His Catholic guilt nagged him, and he followed suit. Then came fat-free milk. There is a puritan streak in today's narcissistic culture of gyms and dieting that makes anathema many of life's little luxuries.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Unchecked consumption will waste the planet

    • Val Yule
    • 31 October 2007
    2 Comments

    So many of the goods you see in shop windows will soon be waste, mostly landfill. Cutting waste is the fastest way to reduce carbon emissions and cope with other crises of climate change.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Knowledge that eludes the search engine

    • Philip Harvey
    • 08 March 2007
    2 Comments

    The poetry of Peter Steele is well-tempered, even when the subject is not. His themes are often modesty, doubt and brokenness, but his uses his grand style to produce measured tones and educated observations.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The brush and the pen

    • Peter Steele
    • 01 July 2006

    Art speaks, but we sometimes need translation

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Language so lovely

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe
    • 18 June 2006

    Chris Wallace-Crabbe on After Shakespeare: An Anthology and The Oxford Book of Aphorisms, both edited by John Gross.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Movie reviews

    • Allan Thomas, Zane Lovitt, Lucille and Juliette Hughes, Siobhan Jackson, Allan James Thomas
    • 14 May 2006

    Reviews of the films Oldboy, Bride and Prejudice, The Illustrated Family Doctor and House of Flying Daggers.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The material stretched by the spiritual

    • Peter Steele
    1 Comment

    The Spirit of Secular Art, for all its attention to the work of human hands devoted to festivity, often has an eye on human affairs at large. It can function as a challenge to many of the central themes of contemporary political life in Australia.

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