keywords: Diac

  • AUSTRALIA

    Football and my father's ghost

    • Adrian Phoon
    • 23 June 2010
    6 Comments

    When Switzerland scored with a crazy goal against the heavily favoured Spain, I could almost hear my father leaping from the couch and cheering. Before he died, he was a football fanatic. I have learned to love it. It's my way of communing with him.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    New ways of talking about God

    • Philip Harvey
    • 19 March 2010
    2 Comments

    The poet Rainer Maria Rilke's 'God', writes Stephanie Dowrick, 'is a vulnerable neighbour one moment, like a clump of a hundred roots the next; an ancient work of art, then a much-needed hand, a cathedral, a dreamer. Absent here, breath-close there; as often in darkness as in light.'

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  • RELIGION

    Strange encounters on the Spanish Camino

    • Tony Doherty
    • 14 October 2009
    5 Comments

    We entered the house expecting the warm hospitality usually offered to weary pilgrims. But a small ancient man barred our way and attacked us with a venom normally reserved for carriers of some ancient plague, snarling like an enraged guard dog.

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  • EUREKA STREET TV

    Winton's numinous Breath

    • Peter Kirkwood
    • 17 July 2009
    2 Comments

    A few weeks ago Tim Winton's Breath was awarded this year's Miles Franklin Literary Award. This video trailer is a poetic combination of strong images, haunting music, quotes, and eloquent interview with the author.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Migration reform good news at last

    • Kerry Murphy
    • 01 July 2009
    1 Comment

    'Migration reform' rarely has positive connotations when dealing with refugees and asylum seekers. As asylum seekers continue to reach Australia by boat, reforms to Labor's immigration policies point to a more just approach.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Why Aussie politicians should learn to party

    • John Warhurst
    • 30 January 2009
    7 Comments

    Obama's inauguration included official ceremonies, public speeches, street parties and ten presidential balls. Such pomp and ceremony is underrated. If he had been sworn in, Australian-style, it would have been a much duller affair.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Wall Street Blues

    • Jim McDermott
    • 20 October 2008
    6 Comments

    As I walk the streets of Manhattan, things seem much the same as always. Yet newspapers are peppered with references to the market 'cratering', a term that conjures the desolate landscape of the moon. A friend suggested another interpretation: 'A crater is what's left after a massive explosion.'

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Hmong refugees' scant Aussie hope

    • Joanna Maxwell
    • 20 June 2008

    This week the Refugee Council of Australia marks Refugee Week and World Refugee Day. At Petchabun camp, 350 kilometres north of Bangkok, thousands of 'forgotten' Hmong refugees remain in limbo. Their future looks bleak.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Tibet trauma not written in the stars

    • Brian Matthews
    • 17 April 2008

    'Geo-politically astute' astrologer Jessica Murray believes revelations about China's violations against Tibet were prompted by astrological activity. For all their glib outlandishness and pseudo-scientific jargon, contemporary astrologers still fascinate.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Playwrights finger reality missed by politicians

    • Richard Flynn
    • 09 January 2008

    As Australians wait for a Federal election, Hilary Glow’s book is timely evidence that what is wrong with the world is what politicians would have us believe. Contemporary playwrights are wrestling with the issues seen as crucial to the notion of who we really are as Australians in the twenty-first century. From 17 October 2007.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Bangladesh climate under the weather

    • Ben Fraser
    • 13 December 2007

    Bangladesh is perhaps the most disaster prone country on earth, with seasonal monsoons and cyclones among its most destructive phenomena. The cyclical nature of these disasters has led the Bangladesh government to pursue a more holistic approach to disaster management.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Playwrights finger reality missed by politicians

    • Richard Flynn
    • 17 October 2007

    As Australians wait for a Federal election, Hilary Glow’s book is timely evidence that what is wrong with the world is what politicians would have us believe. Contemporary playwrights are wrestling with the issues seen as crucial to the notion of who we really are as Australians in the twenty-first century.

    READ MORE

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