keywords: Europe

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • AUSTRALIA

    Old Europe reigns supreme in World Cup

    • James Massola
    • 10 July 2006
    2 Comments

    While refereeing standards have been the subject of much debate at this World Cup, and some have decried the paucity of goals, the re-assertion of ‘Old Europe’s’ footballing pre-eminence has escaped serious analysis.

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  • INFORMATION

    Peace drums in Europe

    • Michael McKernan, Frank O’Shea, Mark Deasey, Morag Fraser, John Carmody, Brigid Hains, Pip Robertson
    • 03 July 2006

    Peace drums, Irish visitor, Travellers’ tales, Epiphanies, Deep structure, Counter-terrorism kits, Circling the square

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  • AUSTRALIA

    On the edge of Europe

    • Anthony Ham
    • 08 May 2006

    Norway has enjoyed great prosperity but this may not continue indefinitely

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The arc of European reconciliation

    • Hugh Dillon
    • 29 April 2006

    Both the Dresden firestorm and the Holocaust were products of the insidious tendency in wartime for the previously unthinkable to become routine.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Europe’s Muslim future

    • Anthony Ham
    • 24 April 2006

    In grappling with a growing Muslim population, Europe must choose between assimilation, integration or accommodation.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Until debt do us part

    • David James
    • 20 October 2020
    3 Comments

    The global economy was already teetering on the edge of such a debt crisis before the coronavirus hit. The economic shutdowns have accelerated the damage.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Let them pick fruit

    • Vivienne Cowburn
    • 13 October 2020
    19 Comments

    An idea that’s gaining traction, in a pandemic where international travel has stopped and many Australians are losing their jobs, is this notion that the unemployed (aka: everyone on JobSeeker payments) should go out into the regions and help the farmers pick fruit.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Keep on walking

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 29 September 2020
    17 Comments

    Here in Greece, people seem to be smoking less and walking more. Gone are the days when long walks were measured in the time it took to smoke x number of cigarettes, the cigarettes being considered compensation for the walking, for the latter was equated with work and certainly not with pleasure. But the practice of walking can, of course, accomplish great things.

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  • ECONOMICS

    The great economic rethink?

    • David James
    • 20 August 2020
    6 Comments

    There will be Great Reset in finance and economics. It is inevitable because the shock has been so great. The first problem is what to do with global debt, which was already at unsustainable levels before the virus hit: over 320 per cent of global GDP. The only way to prevent system-wide failure has been to lower interest rates to near zero levels.

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  • ENVIRONMENT

    Lawsuits over climate crisis risk

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 30 July 2020
    2 Comments

    On July 22, Katta O'Donnell filed an action in the Federal Court in Victoria hoping to make good her promise to put the government on trial for ‘misconduct’. The action notes that, ‘At all material times there has existed a significant likelihood that the climate is changing, and will continue to change, as the result of anthropogenic influences.’ Australia was ‘materially exposed and susceptible’ to the risks posed by climate change.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Born free

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 28 July 2020
    20 Comments

    During times of crisis concepts such as power and liberty are often brought into the light and re-examined, and it is a sad fact that during those same times, people in power often try to chip away at liberty, at democracy’s most basic freedoms: several current world leaders immediately spring to mind.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    The reconquest of Hagia Sophia?

    • Daniel Sleiman
    • 28 July 2020
    7 Comments

    Erdogan’s announcement in relation to the Hagia Sophia is one that is heavily influenced and panders to his Islamist sentiments and supporters. Hagia Sophia, often touted as the pinnacle of Byzantine church architecture and design, was reverted to a museum in 1935 by the founder of the modern Turkish republic, Kemal Ataturk. Altering its status to a mosque is clearly about propping up Erdogan’s Islamist credentials and base, which have slowly been eroding civil freedoms in the Turkish nation.

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