keywords: I Love You Philip Morris

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Black Saturday gibe mars Murray's might

    • Philip Harvey
    • 16 April 2010
    6 Comments

    In one poem Les Murray would reduce the causes of the Black Saturday fires to differences in forest management between 'hippies' and 'rednecks'. Utilising poetry to play the blame game demeans our understanding of the complexity of that disaster.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Imelda Marcos the Musical

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 15 April 2010

    'Like most politicians, she was driven by psychological angels and demons', writes musician David Byrne of Imelda Marcos, the former first lady ofthe Philippines. Byrne has written a 'musical' about Marcos' life. From the outset, he risks deifying a monster.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    New ways of talking about God

    • Philip Harvey
    • 19 March 2010
    2 Comments

    The poet Rainer Maria Rilke's 'God', writes Stephanie Dowrick, 'is a vulnerable neighbour one moment, like a clump of a hundred roots the next; an ancient work of art, then a much-needed hand, a cathedral, a dreamer. Absent here, breath-close there; as often in darkness as in light.'

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The allure of J. D. Salinger and Shane Warne

    • Brian Doyle
    • 03 February 2010
    6 Comments

    Just as Brits were more absorbed by Byron's life than his work, and Australians were absorbed by Shane Warne's antics more than his artistry, J. D. Salinger grew more famous for retreating from public life, than for his masterpieces.

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  • RELIGION

    Patient autonomy and the doctor's conscience

    • Frank Brennan
    • 18 September 2009
    4 Comments

    In Life and Death: How do we honour the Patient's Autonomy and the Doctor's Conscience? Frank Brennan's Sandra David Oration at St Vincent's Clinic, Darlinghurst, Sydney, 17 September 2009.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Patron saint of troublemakers

    • James Martin
    • 07 August 2009
    8 Comments

    In 1871 Mary MacKillop was excommunicated by her local bishop on the grounds that 'she had incited the sisters to disobedience and defiance'. The idea of a holy woman who had been at loggerheads with the hierarchy is not new in the annals of the saints.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Blind anxiety

    • Brendan Forde
    • 22 July 2009
    9 Comments

    I gag in social situations. Visual cues that mediate conversation are not available to me, so halfway through a sentence, confidence evaporates. I'm convinced they're not interested, or I think I hear them stifling a yawn. Why did I ever start to talk?

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Aged care in purgatory

    • Scott Stephens
    • 01 June 2009
    10 Comments

    Our failure to care for and honour our elderly is one of the great causes of moral impoverishment in our culture. Lives tempered by age and hard-earned virtue are gifts from God. It is to our detriment that we ignore them.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Aged Lothario's terror and redemption

    • Sarah Kanowski
    • 16 April 2009

    The narrator of Philip Roth's novella The Dying Animal is self-indulgent, narcissistic, and driven by the urge to sexually conquer. The film Elegy transposes Roth's log of masculine decline into a mournful lament for the dead.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The trouble with free speech

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 12 March 2009
    2 Comments

    A French satirical paper was sued for portraying Muslims as terrorists and labelling them 'jerks'. The editors would have us believe it's a case of free speech versus censorship. But there's more to it than that.

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  • RELIGION

    Euthanasia: doctors' conscience vs patient rights

    • Frank Brennan
    • 02 March 2009
    2 Comments

    The medical pledge to do no harm no matter what the cost effective benefits, and the conscience of the doctor are still key elements in any law which promotes good medicine. –Frank Brennan, addressing the Medico Legal Society of Victoria

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Comradely with Ginsberg

    • Philip Harvey
    • 21 November 2008

    Although not a beat poem, a Peter Steele poem shares Ginsberg's aesthetic of the poem as measure of breath. Breath is commanding like an original lecture, enspiriting like a true sermon, propulsive like a perfect dinner conversation.

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