keywords: Language

There are more than 200 results, only the first 200 are displayed here.

  • MEDIA

    The language of fire

    • Philip Harvey
    • 24 February 2009
    10 Comments

    Melbourne had the strange experience of reading and listening to bushfire reports for five days while neither seeing nor smelling smoke. When the mind has no sensory leads to interpret, words become critical.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Language so lovely

    • Chris Wallace-Crabbe
    • 18 June 2006

    Chris Wallace-Crabbe on After Shakespeare: An Anthology and The Oxford Book of Aphorisms, both edited by John Gross.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Budging language

    • Eureka Street
    • 14 May 2006

    Thoughts from around the nation.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Social connectivity in a pandemic

    • Jane Britt
    • 30 March 2020
    4 Comments

    It’s a stressful and anxious time for many people. Yet, the expression to ‘look for the helpers’ whenever a crisis occurs is an apt one in this situation. People are looking for social connectivity and ways to express kindness to others in practising social distancing under direction of medical experts.

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Education can uplift refugee women in Indonesia

    • Warsan Weedhsame
    • 25 March 2020
    3 Comments

    For the last two years I have been an advocate for the refugee community in Jakarta. I have seen how women’s education is the first and most important need for women to secure their rights. Each week, I meet many refugee women who can’t speak up for their rights.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    We need a robust democracy now more than ever

    • John Warhurst
    • 23 March 2020
    20 Comments

    COVID-19 brings many tests. Amid the health, economic and financial crises brought about by the pandemic, our greatest test is to conduct ourselves as a robust democracy and to demonstrate that we are a fair society. Neither test will be easy to pass, but we must aim to emerge at the other end as a better society.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The treachery of sand

    • Les Wicks
    • 16 March 2020

    Anchored in the treachery of sand, wearing waves until the snip of a certain comber shreds them landward. They call this weed. There are people here too busy in their pleasure. They stare further out across the stolid hungers of tankers queued to feed national necessity, rapacity.  

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  • AUSTRALIA

    Protecting civil liberties in a time of COVID-19

    • Binoy Kampmark
    • 10 March 2020
    6 Comments

    Authorities can also be fearful, paranoid at the unruly nature of their subjects. Public health emergencies have been declared in various countries and while these are deemed necessary, they come with the exercise of broad, muscular powers.

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  • AUSTRALIA

    The rising corporatisation of queer identity

    • Dejan Jotanovic
    • 05 March 2020
    8 Comments

    Pride is politically messy. When you stir together an alphabet soup of people all of which have other intersecting identities (race, class, religion, political allegiance), you will invariably plate up a political mess. And the 2020 Sydney Mardi Gras dished quite the menu. 

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Delhi's spirit resists divisive ideology

    • Irfan Yusuf
    • 05 March 2020
    8 Comments

    The divisive and foreign Hindutva ideology goes against the culture and spirit of Delhi. Recently Modi’s party were trounced in local elections. Almost always the violence and hatred is caused by outsiders and resisted by the Dilli-walas.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The ecology of words

    • Andrew Hamilton
    • 04 March 2020
    8 Comments

    To speak of the ecology of words can be illuminating because it evokes the wide range of relationships that words embody. It also invites us to ask broad questions about the healthy and unhealthy use of words in a society.

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  • ECONOMICS

    Be wary of a cashless future

    • David James
    • 03 March 2020
    10 Comments

    We live in an era of hyper-transactionalism, whereby most of what we do is subject to the exchange of money and market pricing. Whereas in the past much of humanity was bound to a political system, now most of us are bound to a globalised monetary system.

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