keywords: Library Book

  • AUSTRALIA

    The Labor split

    • Paul Strangio
    • 25 April 2006

    The healing begins 

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    In a minor key

    • Luke Fraser
    • 25 April 2006

    Luke Fraser reviews Frontier Justice: A History of the Gulf Country to 1900, by Tony Roberts.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Sensitivity and skill

    • Sara Dowse
    • 25 April 2006

    Sara Dowse finds much to admire in two new novels by Jan Borrie, Unbroken Blue and Nigel Featherstone, Remnants.

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  • INFORMATION

    Letters to Eureka Street

    • Nigel Sinnott, Jan Pinder, CameronĀ  Forbes and Brian McCoy
    • 24 April 2006

    Letters from Nigel Sinnott, Jan Pinder, Cameron  Forbes and Brian McCoy

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Inside the Speagle tent

    • John Button
    • 24 April 2006

    John Button reviews Henry Speagle’s Editor’s Odyssey: A Reminiscence of Civil Service 1945–1985.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Searching for Borrisnoe

    • Peter Hamilton
    • 21 April 2006
    1 Comment

    It’s a long way to Tipperary from New York, via Victoria, and once there it’s not so easy to trace your grandmother’s footsteps

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  • INTERNATIONAL

    Redemption in East Timor

    • Sian Prior
    • 20 April 2006

    With the encouragement of an Australian nun, inmates at Becora Prison are finding ways out of the darkness of their crimes into the light of new hope.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    True fakes

    • Simon Caterson
    • 20 April 2006

    We all know about the supposedly true books that turn out to be fakes, but perhaps even more remarkable is the way fiction can somehow become fact.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Vintage 2005

    • Jennifer Moran
    • 20 April 2006

    The best of 2005 - Jennifer  Moran  on three annual anthologies of Australian writing.

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  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    The material stretched by the spiritual

    • Peter Steele
    1 Comment

    The Spirit of Secular Art, for all its attention to the work of human hands devoted to festivity, often has an eye on human affairs at large. It can function as a challenge to many of the central themes of contemporary political life in Australia.

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