keywords: Plague Fiction

  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Learning in a time of pestilence

    • Gillian Bouras
    • 04 May 2020
    15 Comments

    What turned out to be extraordinary was the familiarity of the subject matter, and the routines that Camus makes the authorities of the plague-ridden Algerian town Oran put in place: the quarantine, the isolation hospitals, the attempts to develop a vaccine, the volunteer health workers, and the way in which funerals were conducted in haste.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Our not so distant past

    • Tim Robertson
    • 17 April 2020
    9 Comments

    I can’t be the only one who has, in recent weeks, found myself reaching for my dog-eared copy of Daniel Defoe’s A Journal of the Plague Year, a fictional re-telling of the 1665 great plague of London.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Illness and the indescribable

    • Brian Matthews
    • 03 April 2020
    3 Comments

    Illness, so apparently explicit and ever more obvious as it progresses, in fact defies definition: submitting apparently to scientific and medical description, it escapes into a quality of pain, exquisite loss or appalled helplessness that is often most clearly captured at the heart of great works of art.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    No stranger now

    • Earl Livings
    • 24 February 2020
    2 Comments

    I circle the huge granite standing stone sunwise three times, as my ancestors did long before the designs of cranes and coins, of theory. ‘Tell me how and what they thought.’ No answer but the wheeling murmuration of a thousand starlings. A stubble field.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Little Adonis and the fruit box

    • Helena Kadmos
    • 11 July 2012
    21 Comments

    When my father was born his parents named him Adonis, but for the first few years he was called Adonaki, Little Adonis. I picture him standing in the classroom on a fruit box, with his dark curly hair. His hair is still curly if it gets long enough, but it is very soft and silvery. He listens as I read this story to him and he wants to set some things straight.

    READ MORE
  • MARGARET DOOLEY AWARD

    Inhaling God

    • Jessica Voelker
    • 14 September 2011
    1 Comment

    One American physicist claims each breath we take contains molecules of air that were also breathed by Archimedes, Aristotle, and even Jesus Christ. Through physics, religion, the human body, and mythology, there is a thread that weaves us into a continuous rich tapestry.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Teen sexuality at the apocalypse

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 17 March 2011

    New Queer Cinema is a genre marked by its robust portrayal of gay, lesbian, bisexual or transgender protagonists, usually as outsiders or renegades from conventional society. Alienation and otherness drive the characters into each other's orbits with the force of a familial bond.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    No clear villains in Facebook tragedy

    • Tim Kroenert
    • 28 October 2010

    Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg is reportedly displeased with the film. The decay of his friendship with co-founder Eduardo Savarin during the creation of a site predicated on accumulating 'friends' is the film's greatest irony, and greatest tragedy. 

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Historical novels

    • Delia Falconer
    • 06 July 2006

    Are we writing too many of them? Is there a crisis of relevance in Austlit? No, argues Delia Falconer.

    READ MORE
  • ARTS AND CULTURE

    Quick reviews

    • Brooke Davis, Elizabeth Allen, Joel Townsend, Robert Hefner
    • 21 April 2006

    Reviews of the books Everyman’s Rules for Scientific Living; Invisible Yet Enduring Lilacs; The Weather Makers: The History and Future Impact of Climate Change; and Does my head look big in this?

    READ MORE

x

Subscribe for more stories like this.

Free sign-up